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Holly-Blue-Butterfly
A Handsome Green hedge to absorb pollution
 

Hedges and Topiary.

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Holly-Blue-Butterfly
Page 2
Hedges & Topiary.
Garden hedge to absorb pollution
 

Handsome green hedges to absorb pollution.

                 

A Handsome Hedge.
A hedge to absorb pollution: If you want to reduce noise from the street and fumes from the traffic, choose dense evergreen hedge plants such as Japanese euonymus, cotoneaster, pyracantha, Leyland cypress or false cypress.
  • Some deciduous hedges such as beech or hornbeam will also absorb sound, even in winter, as they hold on to many of their dead leaves during the colder months.
A protective hedge:  One reason for planting a hedge is to deter both human and Wildlife intruders, and plants with prickles and spines are particularly effective. Pyracantha, elaeagnus, berberis, blackthorn, dog rose, holly and hawthorn will all form a secure wall, either used alone or in combination, and they will be covered in flowers in spring and berries for the birds in autumn.
  • To create a really impenetrable barrier, erect a sturdy Wire fence before planting. Place your shrubs along this fence and after a few years they will cover the wire.
A new hedge each year: Ring the changes and grow annuals or herbaceous plants to create a different
screen every year. Maize, sunflowers, Jerusalem artichokes and hollyhocks can all be sown or planted
as young plants in spring to create a tall green, flowering hedge that will last from the start of summer through to the first frosts.
A hedge of roses:  Several types of rose make fine, old-fashioned hedges, though they are bare in winter. The best all-rounders are the old roses, because of their dense foliage and long flowering period. Wild species roses such as Rosa rugosa were favourites in the cottage garden and make a tough hedge,
producing an attractive display of hips in autumn.
  • If you want a hedge smothered in flowers, remember to prune the stems to different heights to ensure that the flowers appear all over the hedge instead of just at the top.
A traditional laid hedge:  Hedges made from interlaced willow stems were a feature of old—fashioned country life, being widely available and easy to make, and are regaining popularity in Britain.
  • To create your own traditional willow hedge, ‘plant’ withies — rootless willow stems — at twenty centimetres intervals, inclining them at an angle. Next, interlace another row next to it, inclined at an opposite angle.
Then ‘weave’ alternate withies, one in front and one behind, to form a latticework panel, supported by posts if needed.
 
willow-garden hedge
A traditional laid hedge:  Hedges made from interlaced willow stems were a feature of old—fashioned country life, being widely available and easy to make, and are regaining popularity in Britain.
  • To create your own traditional willow hedge, ‘plant’ withies — rootless willow stems — at 20cm intervals, inclining them at an angle. Next, interlace another row next to it, inclined at an opposite angle.
Then ‘weave’ alternate withies, one in front and one behind, to form a latticework panel, supported by posts if needed.
Water the stems immediately and keep the soil moist.
  • The branches, which are in effect cuttings, will root, and in spring they will sprout new leaves. Trim back excess growth in spring and autumn to reveal the living trellis beneath.
 
 
Planting a Hedge.
                Various specialist fabrics are designed to suppress weeds yet let the rain permeate through to plant roots below. Known as landscape sheeting or mulching membranes, they keep the soil warm and clamp and are ideal for use when planting a new hedge. Once the plants are in place, apply a mulch over the top and water well until the plants are established.

 
 
Planting a Hedge.
 
 
 
1. Loosen the earth in the plot to forty centimetres deep, add  compost and then level the surface. Dig a channel ten centimetres deep round the planting area.

 
 
Planting a hedge using fabric.
 
 
2. Place the fabric over the plot, sliding the edges into  the channels and holding the edges down with stones or soil.

 
 
preparing fabric for planting hedge plants
 
 
3. Use a knife to cut crosses where the plants will go. Fold their corners back and dig a hole large enough to take the rootball.

 
 
placing the garden hedge plant rootball into the fabric.
 
 
4. Set the rootball in the hole, fill with soil, press down, water, then replace fabric over plant base. Then cover the whole bed with an attractive mulch.

 

 
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