garden scene
 
 
Gardens to Visit.

garden scene
Stockwood Park Museum and Gardens
The Period Gardens at Stockwood Park are in the original walled gardens.
Stockwood Park gardens are inspired by nine centuries of gardening history including an Elizabethan Knot Garden, and Victorian Cottage Gardens. The gardens are a beautiful spot throughout the seasons.
Stockwood is one of the few places where visitors can enjoy the work of international artist, Ian Hamilton Finlay outside his native Scotland. The ‘Improvement Garden’ is a classical garden with sculptures full of allusions to ancient Greece and Rome.
The museum houses displays of rural crafts and trades.
Swiss Garden
A visit to The Swiss Garden takes you back to the early 19th century, when an interest in ornamental gardening and picturesque architecture was combined with a passion for 'Swiss Vogue'.
The Swiss Garden is a unique and beautiful example from one of the great periods of English gardening.
Within just 10 acres you can wander among splendid shrubs and rare trees; around tiny islands and ponds; and over intricate ironwork bridges. At the centre of this romantic scene is a tiny thatched Swiss Cottage lined with intricate fretwork and perched on a grassy knoll.
Website: Swiss Cottage Garden
Tofte Manor Gardens
Tofte Manor has 5 acres of beautiful gardens and is one for your diary
The five acres of gardens at Tofte Manor have been redesigned and restored over the last 10 years and have been opened for the National Gardens Scheme, The Red Cross and modern Gardens open day. Features on the garden have appeared in The English Garden magazine and the garden is listed in The Daily Telegraph Good Gardens Guide. Beautiful ancient trees and colour-themed herbaceous borders blend with modern statues and a crystal ball-like water feature. The gardens form the perfect backdrop for the labyrinth and make this an unusual spiritual and peaceful place.
Website: Tofte Manor
Wrest Park Garden, and places to stay
Wrest Park is one of the most magnificent gardens in England, but one of the least well known.
Unlike 'Capability' Brown's natural landscape styling, favoured during the late 18th century, Wrest Park's formal gardens provide a fascinating history of gardening styles, laid out over 150 years and inspired by the great gardens of Versailles in France.
Relying not only on extensive views, but also on revelation and mystery, Wrest Park succeeds in delighting the visitor with surprises at every turn. Yet of all its glories, the grandest is without doubt the recently restored domed Baroque pleasure pavilion, reminiscent of a great Italian cathedral.
Website: Wrest Park and Garden
Basildon Park Garden, near Reading
This beautiful Palladian mansion at Basildon Park and Gardens in a wonderful position above the River Thames was built in 1776-83.
Basildon Park House fell on hard times early in the 20th century and was rescued and restored by Lord and Lady Iliffe and is now filled with fine pictures and fine furniture.
The interior has notable delicate plasterwork, an elegant staircase and unusual Octagon Room.
The formal gardens are limited, with borders around the house, and a small rose garden but the spectacular setting and the beautiful house makes this a good visit for those interested not only in gardens but historic houses.
 
The early 19th century pleasure grounds are currently being restored and there are waymarked trails through the extensive surrounding parkland.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/basildon-park/
Englefield House Garden, near Reading
The formal garden at Englefield House was laid out in the 17th century and the terraces and stone staircases were built in 1860.
Englefield House Garden - This garden must be one of the best kept secrets in Southern England and is one you should definately put in your diary. It was originally created 400 years ago and since then there have been further additions.
At the time of our visit in late June the roses, especially the white ones were looking stunning, not only in the formal gardens but in other parts of the property too. There are also very well kept herbaceous borders with plenty of colour to take you through the seasons.
There is a small garden especially created for children where four little statues conceal hidden jets of water.
The woodland and water garden on the hill above the house was designed and planted in 1936 and is really beautiful with some stunning trees in the woodland areas. This part is really good for wildlife with birdsong, butterflys and deer!
The walled kitchen garden is planted with fruit trees, a large selection of vegetables, herbs, salads, roses, lavender and sweetpeas, but is not always open to the public.
Website: Englefield Gardens
Highclere Castle and Gardens
Highclere House and gardens have some beautiful features and must not be missed. An Egyptian exhibition is open part of the year.
Highclere Castle and its garden was once home to Lord Canarvon who was famous for discovering the tomb of the Egyptian Boy Pharaoh.
More recently it was used for the TV series Downtown Abbey. The Castle (more a grand house) is set within beautiful grounds and many of the species were brought back following his travels abroad. The Cedar trees numbering around 200 are magnificent and the gardens have been improved over recent years. Whilst not extensive they include a well thought out white garden and a secret garden with lovely borders. There is a wildflower garden which you can walk through.
Waltham Place Garden, Maidenhead
Waltham Place Garden has often been described, as, “the best kept secret in Berkshire”, and that should arouse your curiosity to visit this hidden gem.
Waltham Place Garden and Estate - The estate includes a farm, ornamental and kitchen gardens, with a lake and woodlands. It has been managed organically for over 20 years and has matured into a thriving environment. Visitors can come and enjoy the gardens on their own or on a guided walk. Head Gardener Beatrice Krehl, takes groups around the gardens. She explains the principles of naturalistic planting used here. With the current interest in food miles, sustainability, and a greener lifestyle, education is an important part of the Waltham offering and there are tours for schools and adult courses on offer too.
Website: Waltham Place Organic Garden
Birmingham Botanic Garden
Fifteen acres of glorious gardens at Birmingham Botanical Garden one mile form the city centre with excellent facilities for all the family.
Birmingham Botanical Garden has four stunning glasshouses take visitors from tropical to arid climates.The landscaped gardens feature collections of roses, alpines, perennials, rare trees and shrubs. Other attractions include the Woodland Walk; Rock Pool with Diamond Jubilee Cascade; Lawn Aviary, Japanese Garden and National Bonsai Collection.
For children there is the popular playground, Discovery Garden and Growing Schools Garden. There is an exciting programme of events throughout the year including flower shows, family fundays, theatre, art and live music from the Victorian Bandstand every Sunday throughout the summer.
Website: http://www.birminghambotanicalgardens.org.uk/
Castle Bromwich Hall and Gardens
Castle Bromwich is a unique example of an English Baroque Garden.
Castle Bromwich has a 10 acre walled garden (listed grade II*); a rare example of formal English garden design, are being restored as near as possible to the period 1680 - 1740.
The Gardens were developed by several generations of the Bridgeman Family (later to become the Earls of Bradford) reaching peaks of excellence around 1740 and 1900. The Gardens fell into decline during the second half of the twentieth century until they were rescued by the Trust in 1985.
The Holly Maze is a distorted mirror image of the one at Hampton Court Palace designed by George London and Henry Wise.
Website: http://www.cbhgt.org.uk/
Winterbourne House and Garden
Winterbourne is one of the best surviving examples of an Edwardian Arts and Crafts suburban villa garden.
Winterbourne Gardens in Birmingham offers colour and interest throughout the year, the seven acre Grade II listed garden is home to a beautiful walled garden, striking colour themed borders, original sandstone rock garden and stream side planting.
The garden also displays plants from around the globe with collections of plants from China, North and South America and the alpine areas of the world.
There is also a programme of public garden events running throughout the year including open days, special interest tours, local heritage days, music concerts and an Edwardian fete.
Website: http://www.winterbourne.org.uk/
Ascott House and Garden
This is a great Victorian garden which surrounds the Jacobean house owned by the Rothschild family.
At Ascott House and Garden terraced lawns give views across the Chilterns. There is some impressive topiary. a herbaceous walk, lily pond and a fabulous fountain by the American sculptor Thomas Waldo Story.
Something to see in all seasons at Ascot House.
Make time to see Ascott House with its fine collections of fine paintings, oriental porecelain and French furniture.
Website: http://www.ascottestate.co.uk/
Cliveden Gardens
The Long Garden at Cliveden with its topiary and statuary is really impressive.
Cliveden is a spectacular estate with great gardens - with the back of the house overlooking the Parterre and the River Thames in the distance. There are water gardens, woodland and riverside walks with magnificent vistas. There is a maze to keep thw whole family happy.
The topiary in the Long garden is quite unique and will be of interest to those who love this type of gardening.
The present house, the third on the site, was built in 1851 by Charles Barry. Once the home of Nancy, Lady Astor, it is now let as a hotel and is open only on certain days. This property is owned by The National Trust.
Admission to Cliveden House by timed ticket.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cliveden/
Hartwell House Hotel Gardens
Set in 90 acres of parkland, Hartwell House Hotel, Restaurant and Spa now boasts a spring garden planted with snowdrops, daffodils, eranthis, primroses and anemones.
Hartwell House has a historic garden dating from around 1720 probably by James Gibbs with buildings, statues, obelisks, canals and an amazing topiary exhedra, but in 1738 was destroyed in keeping with the growing fashion for the landscape garden. A number of buidings from the original garden still survive.
A path, leading to the Canal Temple, has been planted with 10,000 daffodils.
The recently renovated Triumphal Arch and bridge, has been planted with old varieties of apples and the walls of the former kitchen garden support espaliered apricot, peach, pear and plum trees, of the same variety as those planted in 1856.
Website: http://www.hartwell-house.com/
Hughenden Manor Garden
Lovely gardens surround Hughenden Manor, the home of Victorian Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.
The gardens at Hughenden Manor are set in a delightfully wooded valley and were in the main created by Disraeli's wife Mary Anne.
Formal bedding dating from the 1880s in the South Garden has been restored and the orchard re-created with 35 varieties of apple and 4 of pear. There are some unusual plants at Hughenden Manor including a Chimaera 'Adamii'. Woodland walks. The extraordinary house is open to the public so make sure you have time to visit it. There are plenty of activities and events for children throughout the year.
Website: Hughenden Manor & Gardens
Stowe Landscape Garden
Stowe is one of the finest of Georgian landscape gardens comprising valleys and vistas, narrow lakes and rivers with more than 30 temples and monuments, designed by leading architects of the 18th-century.
Stowe Landscape Garden was the creation of the Temple family, Stowe has been described as “a work to wonder at” in its size, splendour and variety. Many garden buildings at Stowe Landscape Garden have been beautifully restored and thousands of shrubs and trees have been planted in recent years. Restoration work continues in the gardens and the house.
Website: Stowe Landscape Garden
Waddesdon Manor Gardens
The Gardens at Waddesdon Manor were created by Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild in the 1880s from a bare hilltop site.
There are seasonal displays, colourful shrubs and mature trees at Waddesdon Manor.
Carpet bedding displays on the Parterre are created each year.
See the outstanding collection of sculpture and 2 ornamental fountains.
Don't miss the splendid collection of exotic birds in rococo-style aviary of filigree cast iron.
The House is a must see and dates from the 1877 with the design by French architect Gabriel-Hippolyte Destailleur. The rooms are elegant and finely furnished and were used to entertain guests from far and wide. You will also see the historic wine cellars and regular wine tasting events take place.
The property is family friendly with a regular programme of events.
West Wycombe Park
The house with its garden has featured in many recent films and television series.
West Wycombe Park, Buckinghamshire -This perfectly preserved mid-18th century rococco landscape garden, surrounding a neo-classical mansion, was created by Sir Francis Dashwood founder-member of the Dilettanti Society and founder of the Hellfire Club.
The village also belongs to The National Trust and once a year many of its cottage gardens open to the public.
Anglesey Abbey and Gardens
The garden at Anglesey Abbey was developed by the 1st Lord Fairhaven from 1926 and has become one of the British Isles most beautiful 20th century gardens.
Anglesey Abbey and Gardens - There are majestic tree lined avenues and walks which form the framework for hidden, more formal gardens such as the dahlia garden and a semi-circular herbaceous border. Lord Fairhaven's impressive collection of statuary is positioned throughout the gardens.
A large collection of snowdrops at Anglesey Abbey has been established on the eastern side which is dedicated to plants giving winter interest.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/anglesey-abbey/
Cambridge Botanic Garden
Landscape highlights include the Winter Garden, the richly-fragranced Scented Garden, the buzzing Bee Borders and the unique Systematic Beds. The Glasshouse displays range from architectural cactus to flamboyant, tropical rainforests.
With a framework of mature trees and shrubs, this paradise of plants at the University of Cambridge Botanic Garden comprises diverse, superbly landscaped settings including: the Rock Garden representing the alpine plants from the mountains of every continent;
the Lake and Water Garden, teeming with bird life; tropical rainforest, the alpine house and seasonal displays in the Glasshouses and the historic Systematic Beds displaying 1600 hardy representatives of more than 80 families of flowering plants. The Garden also boasts many important plant collections including lavenders, hardy geraniums, British native plants displayed on the Ecological Mound, and the finest collection of trees in the East of England.
Website: Cambridge Botanic Gardens
Chippenham Park Gardens
Originally a great 'Anglo-Dutch' garden of canals, park, and formal gardens open during snowdrop season
Chippenham Park Gardens - This was later informalised in the 18th century and has been greatly extended by present owner. Sweeping seasonal displays of daffodils and snowdrops. Over 250 roses, grand-scale borders, wooded walks and winter-gardens around the ancient canals. A remarkable contemporary, formal garden in the old kitchen garden has been recently added.
Please note that Chippenham Park contains several stretches of open water that would be spoiled by fencing or obtrusive signing. We ask parents of small children to take care while visiting the Park.
Website: http://www.chippenhamparkgardens.info/
Peckover is a Georgian House originally owned by a Quaker banking family and has an outstanding Victorian garden of around 2 acres.
In the gardens at Peckover House there are spacious lawns shaded by specimen trees including gingko, Chusan palm, Tulip tree and monkey puzzle.
As well as colourful double herbaceous borders designed by Graham Stuart Thomas, over seventy types of roses, an Edwardian-planted "Ribbon" border, and three characterful summerhouses.
The Orangery at Peckover House contains fruit trees as well as colourful displays of pot plants throughout the year.
Beautiful displays of daffodils and tulips in Spring.
Take time to visit the classic Georgian merchants house owned by the Peckover family. Learn about how this Quaker family lived and the provincial bank they operated on the same site.
Website: Peckover House and Gardens
The Manor Garden, Hemingford Grey
The Manor at Hemingford Grey was recreated and made famous as the house of Green Knowe by Lucy Boston in her series of children's books, now regarded as classics.
The Manor Garden, Hemingford Grey - This moated house is surrounded by four acres of garden renowned for its collection of over 200 old roses and a collection of irises . There are hidden corners in the garden which are a real delight. With its large herbaceous borders of mainly scented plants the garden gives the feeling of being a cottage garden full of favourite plants in a rather formal setting of lawns with topiary coronation shapes and chess pieces in their black and white planted squares.
Abbeywood Gardens
The Rowlinson family have lived at Abbeywood since 1987, during which time they have made many improvements and additions to the gardens.
Abbeywood Gardens opened to visitors for the first time in 2010.The Main Garden is divided into separate areas by impressive yew hedges. The Pool, Chapel and Pergola Gardens are formal with a naturalistic planting style, providing colour from spring bulbs to late autumn herbaceous.The Christopher Lloyd inspired Exotic Garden, designed around the remnants of the old vegetable garden, is filled with Dahlias, Cannas, Banana and other tender perennials. Giving a colourful display until the first frosts.
The Young Arboretum contains rare evergreen and deciduous trees for year round interest. A 2km wildlife walk incorporates the existing and new woodland on the 45 acre estate.
Adlington Hall and Gardens
Adlington Hall and Garden is situated in the heart of Cheshire home to the same family, the Leghs for over 600 years
There is much to see for the Garden Lover at Adlington Hall. The Lime Avenue dating from 1688 leads to a woodland Wilderness with winding paths, temples, bridges and follies in a rococo manner. A path through the laburnum Arcade leads into the formal Rose Garden, then on to the Maze created in English Yew.
The Father Tiber Water Garden provides a peaceful haven with its ponds, fountains and water cascade and the newly created parterre provides a colourful addition to the east wing. Other features include a large herbaceous border, rockeries, specimen trees, azaleas and rhododendrons.
Website: http://www.adlingtonhall.com/
Arley Hall & Garden
The gardens at Arley Hall date from the 1700s.
The gardens consist of a number of rooms as created by Antoinette Egerton-Warburton and probably the oldest double herbaceous borders in England which has remained virtually unchanged since its creation. In the Spring there are lovely displays of bulbs. early rhododendrons and magnolias and in the summer the walled garden and sun-dial garden come into their own, together with the magnificent herbaceous border and Arbour walk. Fine autumn tints also seen at Arley Hall.
Website: http://www.arleyhallandgardens.com/
Bluebell Cottage Garden, near Dutton
Set on a quiet rural lane, this 2 acre garden is packed with plants and rich in wildlife.
Features at Bluebell Cottage Gardens include an orchard with wildflower meadow beneath, curving herbaceous borders, ponds, alpine scree garden and 'exotica' garden. Chickens and cats prove irresistible to younger visitors. In spring, the ancient bluebell woods are carpeted with native English bluebells. Adjacent nursery stocks a wide collection of herbaceous perennials.
Website: Bluebell Cottage Gardens
Capesthorne Hall Garden
The Capesthorne Garden surround the Hall with woodland, parkland, and lakes.
If you are visiting Cheshire take a trip to the Garden at Capesthorne Hall. Through the Milanese Gates, opposite the Chapel, the tranquil gardens, alongside the estate's chain of lakes, merge colourful perennials with more unusual 18th century plants, maples and cherry trees.
But the natural beauty of Capesthorne also leads to intriguing glimpses of its man-made past... the remains of the Ice House, the Old Boat House and the curious Swallow Hole.
Website: http://www.capesthorne.com/hall-and-gardens/visitor-information.html
Cholmondeley Castle Gardens, near Malpas
Chomondeley Castle is one of Cheshire's Gardens of Distinction. see why!
Cholmondeley Castle and Gardens have been owned by the same family since the 12th Century with extensive ornamental gardens including picturesque temple water garden, rose garden, lakeside walk, picnic and childrens play areas, gift shop, tea room and many more attractions. This truly is a garden for everybody, young and old.
Dunham Massey Garden
This lovely early Georgian House, Dunham Massey, is surrounded by parkland and gardens.
The garden at Dunham Massey is French in style and includes the moat and mount.
There is a parterre and delightful Orangery and an old Well House.
The acid soils are home to moisture loving plants as well as Rhododendrons and an extensive range of hydrangeas. See the Himalayan blue poppies in early summer.
Dunham Massey is a real plantsman's garden and a new winter garden has been developed to much acclaim.
Take time to visit the House, then the sawmill with its restored waterwheel.
The 200 acre deer park is also open.
Website: Dunham Massey
Hare Hill Gardens
Hare Hill Gardens set in 10 acres is a delightful woodland garden with azaleas, rhododendrons and intimate walled garden at its heart.
The delightful walled garden at Hare Hill, Cheshire (National Trust) contains a pergola and wire sculptures.
There is also a woodland garden with many rhododendrons and Azaleas.
The surrounding parkland has attractive walks, including a link path to Alderley Edge.
The Holly collection is of National repute.
Lyme Park Gardens near Stockport
The park and gardens at Lyme Park are set on the foot of the Pennine Hills.
Lyme Park and Garden has a restored Edwardian Rose Garden and Wyatt Garden with camellias, tree lupins and lavender.
There is more to see with a good herbaceous border, wooded ravine bordered by rhododendrons, ferns and azaleas.
Ness Botanic Gardens
Ness Botanic Gardens was created by a cotton merchant and is now one of the finest gardens in the North
Ness Botanic Gardens was born of one man's passionate interest in plants and his desire to share that interest with others. When the Liverpool cotton merchant Arthur Kilpin Bulley began to create a garden in 1898 he laid the foundations of one of the major botanic gardens in the United Kingdom.
Today the lovely Ness Botanic Gardens gardens are a delight to visit with many features including rhododendrons, Ness Botanische, heather garden, Potager, rock garden, water garden and much more.
Visit the Garden Kitchen restaurant, gift shop and plant sales.
Website: Ness Botanic Gardens
Norton Priory and Gardens
Norton Priory has a great garden and is home to much wildlife.
The Brookes developed the tranquil woodland gardens at Norton Priory, whose pathways are still in use and give access to the recreated stream-glade and rock garden.The grounds, bounded by the historic Bridgewater Canal, are home to a rich variety of wild life, especially birds and insects.
The peaceful and relaxing two and a half acre Walled Garden at Norton Priory has won four Britain in Bloom awards. It was built between 1757 and 1770 by the Brooke family as a kitchen garden to provide fresh produce and flowers for the Norton Priory mansion. Close by is the ice house.
Website: http://www.nortonpriory.org/
Rode Hall and Garden is a great place to visit The extensive gardens include a woodland garden with a terraced rock garden and grotto. The formal garden was designed by Nesfield in 1860. There is a large walled kitchen garden, growing many varieties of fruit, vegetables and flowers; including world record gooseberries.
Rode Hall is renowned for its Snowdrop Walks in February and from April the wild garden is ablaze with fine rhododendrons and azaleas, with a carpet of bluebells.
Website: Rode Hall Gardens
Tatton Park Gardens
These delightful Gardens at Tatton Park cover 50 acres. Much of the gardens were designed by Lewis Wyatt in the 1800s and are a collection of gardens within a garden.
Tatton Park is one of the finest Gardens in the British Isles.
The terraced Italian garden which graces the south face of the mansion give beautiful views across the park.
Among the smaller gems of the gardens are the Leech pool, ablaze with colour from banks of azalea each May, the Rose garden which was laid out for Lady Anna Egerton in 1913, and the contrasting Tower garden with its topiary backdrop.
There is so much more to see at Tatton including probably one of the best Japanese gardens in Europe.
The fine Mansion House is also open, with beautiful rooms, fine furniture and paintings. It also houses a collection of Gillow's of Lancaster furniture.
Tatton Park is a great day out for everyone, including families.
Website: http://www.tattonpark.org.uk/
The Lovell Quinta Arboretum
This 28 acre arboretum at The Quinta was created by Sir Bernard Lovell. It is now owned by the Tatton Garden Society.
The planting over the years at The Quinta Arboretum has established the layout of the site which is divided into avenues and definite areas. The avenues and areas are named and many of them commemorate various events in the life of the Lovells.
There are grand avenues which take you among trees and shrubs, as well as wild flower meadows and a nature reserve.
The arboretum is in a delightful setting with views across the River Dane.
The Quinta is worth visiting any time of year.
Website: Quinta Arboretum
Marsh Villa Garden, St Austell
Marsh Villa Gardens has lovely old fashioned plantings in lovely location, good from April to September.
March Villa Garden is an example of 20th century English gardening at its best. I wonder who else could transform a poorly drained marshy meadow into one of the most delightful gardens in Cornwall.
The garden has been lovingly created by Judith Stevens with the first plantings in 1988. The garden is split into different areas which are bordered by light woodland and shrubs. There are informal paths leading you through to more formal areas including a colourful herbaceous border and the more wildlife friendly borders.
A large pond is surrounded by trees where you can sit and listen to the birdsong.
This garden should not be missed.
Website: Marsh Villa Gardens
Edgcumbe House
Part of a Country Park with lovely informal grounds.
Mount Edgcumbe House and Garden is a Grade 1 Historic landscape, and 10 acres of garden in English, French and Italian styles of 18th - 20th century. Spectacular seaside setting by shingle beaches.
The Earl's Garden comprises a shrub garden and informal terrace with a rare18th century shell grotto and is near the Mount Edgcumbe House set on the hill.
Lower down there are 2 gardens to commemorate the family's historical links with New Zealand and America.
There is a National collection of camellias as well as many other shrubs and plants.
Mount Edgcumbe House and gardens are well worth visiting.
Website: Mount Edgcumbe House
Pencarrow House and Gardens, near Bodmin
Pencarrow House, another Cornish garden and extensive woodland best early summer.
50 acres of beautiful historic formal and woodland gardens at Pencarrow House are approached by a mile long drive, flanked by rhododendrons, camellias and blue hydrangeas.
Granite Victorian rockery, lake , Italian Garden. 700 different types of rhododendrons and many unusual flowering shrubs.
Gardens at best before mid June as not many plantings in formal areas.
The imposing mansion is also open and worth seeing. The interior has many fine features including ornate wood panelling, a rococo ceiling, a cantilever stone staircase, handsome stained glass.
The eighth baronet, Sir William Molesworth, expensively redecorated it prior to his 1844 wedding to Andalusia, a singer and London society hostess who had expensive tastes.
There are many great collections to see ranging from china, paintings, furniture to toys.
Events are held throughout the year including openings for snowdrops in February.
Website: Pencarrow House and Garden
Pinetum Park and Gardens
Extensive shrubs, trees and plants which look good most of the year.
Pinetum Park and Garden now has 30 acres of beautiful gardens featuring over 5000 plants including many Mediterranean species lovingly created by Shirley and Ray Clemo.
Water gardens with large wildlife pond and Marsh gardens. Lake with Black Swans and ducks.
Ferns, woodland walk, herbaceous borders and trees, see the Acer glade and the collection of conifers in the Pinetum.
Japanese garden which is now established, and was carefully designed following a visit to Japan. There is also a National collection of grevilleas. Four Acre Winter Garden. Pine Lodge is well worth a visit.
Website: http://www.pinetumpark.com/
Poppy Cottage Garden
Poppy Cottage Garden is one of the prettiest in the South West - Lovely. Visit here if you can.
Popy Cottage Garden has a delightful small garden of 1 acre has been formed from a small uncared plot to one of the best gardens you will see of this size.
If you are looking to design a garden on a long fairly narrow plot then you will get many good ideas here.
Along one side the garden is split into a series of sheltered garden rooms whilst on the other side there are small sweeping lawns edged with colourful borders.
This is a plantsman's garden brimming with bulbs, herbaceous plants, shrubs, exotic plants and of course poppies. Most of the plants are well labelled.
There are plenty of places to sit and at the far end of the garden there is an area with unusual ducks and chickens.
Website: Poppy Cottage Garden
St. Michaels Mount Garden
St Michaels Mount has superb subtropical gardens and you can also visit the castle.
The semi sub tropical Gardens which partially surround this spectacular medieval castle and church have been improved over recent years.
The castle at St Michaels Mount is set on a rocky island about half a mile from the mainland and can be reached by a causeway or by ferry if the tide is in.
Part of the gardens are on terraces climbing up around 200 feet, these were built around the 1870s. The terraces remind me of some of the gardens we have seen in Italy with many exotic and semi tropical plants.
Recent developments include a wild flower meadow where swallows dive above the wild flowers for insects.
The gardens are not extensive but are worth a visit especially if combined with a visit inside the fascinating castle.
Website: stmichaelsmount@nationaltrust.org.uk
Trelissick Gardens, Truro
Lovely in Spring with informal walks, and great views.
Trelissick Gardens set in more than 400 acres of sweeping parkland with beautiful views of the Fal River and Estuary. The first garden trails takes you through a large collection of hydrangeas, camellias and rhododendrons together with sub tropical plants. But that is not all a further path takes you over a stone bridge to another lovely area of more fine plants and Spring bulbs. There is the National collection of azaras and photinias. In the dell there are tree ferns hostas and hellebores. There are also formal borders which give great colour in late summer.
The small walled garden contains aromatic plants. Open air music and theatrical events in season are held regularly.
Website: Trelissick Garden 
Trengwainton Garden, near Penzance
Trengwainton Garden is best in Spring and early summer with tree ferns, rhododendrons, magnolias, views to St Michael's Mount.
This lovely National Trust garden at Trengwainton is perhaps the best for growing exotic trees and shrubs. including tree ferns.
Many tender species flourish in the unusually mild climate, a plantsman's paradise.
There is a new pond and summerhouse with fine views to St Michaels Mount which is also featured by us.
Great collection of magnolias, and camellias with a series of walled gardens built to the dimensions of Noahs Ark.
The stream garden alongside the drive bordered by beechwood gives much colour throughout the seasons.
Website: Trengwainton Garden
Trerice Manor House and Garden, places to visit near Newquay
Beautiful Manor House.
The small garden at Trerice Manor is a great place to visit near Newquay and best in summer around a mellow Elizabethan Manor House in a delightful setting.
Good blue and white border alongside one of the walls, and further borders in front of the Manor House.
Rare and unusual plants, shrubs and climbers.
Interesting collection of mowers and combined with a visit to the Manor the garden is well worth a visit.
The Elizabethan Manor House is one of the finest in Cornwall and has changed little over the years. Make sure you see inside.
Website: Trerice Manor and Gardens
Tresco Abbey Gardens
You will always remember your visit here!
Abbey Gardens Tresco - This is a world famous garden situated around 28 miles from Cornwall on the Scilly Isles.
In 20 minutes we were transported to a different world. Tresco is a beautiful sub-tropical island & we spent three happy & relaxed days at the luxurious Island Hotel which is set in lush green gardens overlooking the sea.
The 17 acre Abbey Gardens were started nearly 200 years ago they are still owned by the fifth generation of the same family and are truly spectacular. We saw Proteas (which we last saw in South Africa) and other exotic flowers from all over the world in full bloom alongside the daffodils. Well worth a visit.
Website: Tresco Abbey Gardens
Trewidden Garden
Trewidden Garden is a great place to see rhododendrons, camellias and magnolias in a semi wild setting.
Welcome to Trewidden Garden which is steeped in history as well as natural beauty. Just one of over 500 gardens you will find on our guide.
Originally planted by T B Bolitho in the late 19th Century, the 15 acre garden offers an unforgettable orchestra of colour throughout the year and particularly during the spring months.
A large yet peaceful and intimate garden with a maze of paths to explore. Dramatic tree ferns, magnolias, camellias, magnificent shrubs, ancient tin workings, water features and year-round interesting and unusual plants.
A hidden gem of West Cornwall.
We visited in late March when the camellias were at there best. Most of the magnolias were looking great too.
Website: Trewidden Garden
Trewithen Garden near Truro
Some of the finest magnolias you will see anywhere.
These gardens at Trewithen are outstanding and Internationally famous. One of 40 gardens worldwide (and only 1 of 5 in the UK) recognised by the International Camellia Society as a Garden of Excellence.
Best in Spring they have a magnificent collection of not only camellias but also rhododendrons, magnolias and many rare trees and shrubs seldom found elsewhere in Britain.
A fine grass avenue leads up to the House bordered by large magnolias.
Further pathways take you around the garden where you can see tree ferns, azaleas and acers.
Many of the magnolias and rhododendrons will be the largest you can see in England.
Many other features and plants including climbers.
Abbey House Garden, Malmesbury
Abbey House in Malmesbury was once part of the Benedictine Monastery founded about 666 AD.The site for Abbey House and its Garden was cultivated by monks for medicinal herbs and also as the Abbots garden. Since the dissolution by Henry V111 in 1539 been privately owned and over the past ten years has been developed to become  a garden delight to gardening lovers from all over the world. There are 2000 roses and 2000 herbs which give a great display in the summer. In the spring the borders are a mass of colours with thousands of tulips and daffodils. This is followed by the roses and herbaceous borders which take you into late summer. Paths lead you down to the bottom garden where there are shade loving plants, specimen trees and shrubs. Walk along the the river including St Aldhelm's Pool where you might be lucky to see Kingfishers and Yellow Wagtails. Make sure you see Malmesbury Abbey where King Athelstan was buried which is only 200 yards away. An unforgettable afternoon.
Website: http://www.abbeyhousegardens.co.uk/
Barnsley House and Garden
Barnsley House has a beautiful small garden of 4 acres created by the late Rosemary Verey one of the 20th's centuries most famous designers.  The Barnsley House Garden was redesigned by Rosemary Verey who helped design a border at Prince Charles's Garden at Highgrove. Visitors from all over the world still visit here. Featured on television many times, the garden surrounds a splendid Cotswold stone house which is now a hotel. Gardens within gardens, colourful borders, knot garden, lime walk and Kitchen garden all carefully designed to fit in with the landscape. There is plenty of colour all year round but many think it is at it's best in late Spring.
Website: http://www.barnsleyhouse.com/
Batsford Arboretum
Batsford Arboretum is set in 56 acres of lovely Cotswold Countryside and contains over 1500 trees with species from all over the world. Batsford Arboretum has beautiful colours throughout the year, snowdrops in winter, followed by daffodils and then marvellous displays from the Cherries and Magnolias in spring. In summer see the bamboo groves, fine bronze statues and waterside plantings. It all comes together in Autumn with glorious Autumn tints and great colours.
Website: http://www.batsarb.co.uk/
Bourton House Garden
An award-winning three acre garden high on the Cotswolds with wonderful views over the surrounding countryside.  The Bourton House Garden, near Moreton on the Marsh features imaginative topiary (including knot garden, walk and parterre), magnificent wide herbaceous borders filled with rare, unusual and exotic plants, several water features (including a raised Basket Pond from the Great Exhibition of 1851) and many creatively planted pots.  The garden is always beautiful but absolutely glorious in the summer months and early autumn. There is a seven acre pasture walk following the Head Gardener’s guide to the specimen trees planted in 1994 and 1995.  HHA/Christie’s ‘Garden of the Year’ 2006.  The gardens have been awarded Cotswolds Tourism ‘Small Visitor Attraction of the Year’ 2013 (Silver award).
Website: http://www.bourtonhouse.com/
Cerney House Garden
This secret Cotswold garden at Cerney House, high above the lovely Churn Valley is a very special and friendly place. The walled garden at Cerney House has a lovely atmosphere and you can admire the plants as well as listening to the birdsong from the surrounding woods. See the old fashioned roses along the trellis, herbaceous borders and wonderful scents. In April there are lovely displays of tulips joining the last of some very special daffodils. There is a well labeled herb garden and working kitchen garden. Colourful rockery. The 3.5 acre red brick walled garden has many colourful borders and seating areas.
Website: http://www.cerneygardens.com/
Colesbourne Park Snowdrops
The snowdrop collection at Colesbourne Park originated in the plantings made by Henry John Elwes (1846-1922). In 1874 Henry Elwes had discovered Galanthus elwesiis while travelling in western Turkey and he became one of the prominent galanthophiles of his day. It is clear that he planted widely, as the Colesbourne Park garden today contains large populations of snowdrops, many of them hybrids, descended from those plantings.New cultivars have been added to the collection each year, with the collection now totalling some 250 cultivars.
Website: http://www.snowdrop.org.uk/
Hidcote Manor Garden
A top ten Great British Garden - Hidcote Manor is one of the greatest gardens in England created this century by the great horticulturist Major Lawrence Johnston.
The Hidcote Manor Garden should not be missed. It is situated in the beautiful Cotswold countryside amongst hills, rolling valleys, and drystone walls.
Hidcote comprises of a  series of small gardens within a garden,  but also with long avenues bordered by different plantings. The garden is famous for rare shrubs and trees as well as its outstanding design features. There are water features, wild flower areas and pools with plenty of places to sit and take in the atmosphere.
See the long herbaceous borders which gives a great splash of colour from July and
walk amongst the old scented roses along the walkway and small garden houses.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hidcote/
Highgrove House Gardens
‘The Gardens At Highgrove, Gloucestershire HRH The Prince of Wales has spent 30 years transforming the grounds of Highgrove into what have been acknowledged as some of the most inspired and innovative gardens in the United Kingdom. His Royal Highness’s strict adherence to organic and sustainable methods has helped create gardens which are both magical and intriguing while being environmentally sound; encouraging both plants and wildlife to thrive.
Website: http://www.highgrovegardens.com/
Kelmscott Manor Gardens
Kelmscott Manor was the home of William Morris famous for his textile designs.
Before venturing out into the small garden at Kelmscott Manor, near Lechlade take time to read the Garden leaflet which gives it history. This will make your visit more enjoyable.
William Morris loved this garden which has been recreated using many of the plants which he loved and from which many of his designs came.
The mulberry garden is dominated by the original tree which was there in 1921. This leads to a small orchard with varieties of Victorian apples. The lashed fencing has been copied from original photos.
The garden is worth visiting if combined with a visit to the Manor which house many of William Morris's designs. It also houses some of his furnitue and paintings and was used as a summer house.
Website: http://www.kelmscottmanor.co.uk/
Kiftsgate Court Gardens
Kiftsgate Court Gardens are magnificently situated garden on the edge of the Cotswold escarpment with views towards the Malvern Hills.
The gardens planted around the late 19th century  Kiftsgate House are planted to give harmonious colour schemes, whilst the sheltered lower garden is home to more tender plants. Heather Muir created the garden from sloping woods and was helped by. Heather was helped  by her lifelong friend Lawrence Johnston who created Hidcote just 1 mile away. Since then the Garden has been developed and improved by two more women gardeners, the present one being Anne Chambers.
Walk down steep paths to a beautiful pool on a terrace which is hidden from the rest of the garden, with the most fantastic views over the Cotswolds as well as plenty of places to sit to take in the atmosphere.
There are tulips in the Spring, but the roses are the true highlight of the garden - scrambling over trees and shrubs, but more formal ones too!
Website: http://www.kiftsgate.co.uk/
Misarden Park Gardens
Misarden Park Gardens are in  a stunning situation 700 feet above sea level at head of Golden Valley.
There is a beautiful Spring Walk with naturalised bulbs and flowering trees. See great displays of tulips from mid April and a wonderful wisteria ( end of April ) which cloaks the front of the House.
The formal gardens look beautiful in summer with large herbaceous borders, rill and fountain.
Fine topiary avenue which takes you down to the House with more formal areas either side.
All in all a really good way to spend your time. Neighbouring plant nursery with good selection of plants.
Website: http://www.misardenpark.co.uk/pages/misardengardens.html
Painswick Rococo Garden
Painswick Rococo Garden is a unique 18th century garden set in a hidden valley with lovely views of the surrounding countryside.
Painswick Rococo Garden is set on the edge of the Ctswolds. The term 'Rococo Garden' is associated with garden design  from 1720 to 1760.
Its restoration began in 1984 and much of it is now set out in its original form.
A rarely seen 'Exedera' or seating area or place to pass the time of day is set out at the end of the unusually placed vegetable area.
Website: http://www.rococogarden.co.uk/
Rodmarton Manor
A stunning courtyard garden greets you as you enter through the door by the side of the Rodmarton Manor.
Rodmarton Manor is an Arts and Crafts House with a beautiful garden. The courtyard is divided into many sections with lovely plantings and colourful pots amongst areas of dappled shade. This leads to the outstanding herbaceous borders, one of the best that you will find in Southern England. The path takes you to a charming summer house which looks back towards the  manor house. The atmosphere of the garden is superb with many different vistas and plenty of places to sit and take it all in. Combine your visit with a tour of this Arts and Crafts house.
Website: http://www.rodmarton-manor.co.uk/
Sezincote House Gardens
This garden at Sezincote surrounds a fine house built to encompass Indian character in 1810. It is reminiscent of the Brighton Dome.
At Sezincote House and Garden the Indian influence is seen in the drive that goes over an Indian Bridge with statues of bulls. Water features include a temple pool, Canal, stream bordered with bog loving plants.
More formal gardens to the side of the house with elephant statues. Past this and up the hill a new wild flower meadow has been established.
Fine trees include copper beeches, cedars, limes and yews with many unusual shrubs.This is our Autumn secret, the tints are marvellous and  great for photos. It is also fairly quiet and away from the crowds
Many architectural items give these gardens  a distinctive feel.
Website: http://www.sezincote.co.uk/
Snowshill Manor Gardens
This charming small organic garden surrounds this Cotswold Tudor Manor House known as Snowshill Manor.
Snowshill Manor and Garden is set in the middle of the Cotswolds amongst some of the most beautiful countryside in the British Isles.
Very much in the Hidcote style ( though much smaller) but also a reminder of the Arts and Craft movement it has  garden rooms planted to the brim and full of interest and boldly planted pots.
The 2 acre gardens are organically grown with colourful borders, water features and splendid views.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/snowshill-manor/
Stanway House and Fountain
If you are visiting the Cotswolds and are interested in Garden history make sure you take time to visit Stanway House
Stanway Manor House and Fountain is surrounded by 20 acres of grounds which are now complemented by its newly partly restored baroque water garden.
This is one of the finest water features in Britain with pyramid cascade ( not restored), upper pond, waterfall, grand canal. The 300 foot high fountain from June is fantastic and will take your breath away. There are some exceptional trees including old cedars of Lebanon. At the top of the Garden are some breathtaking views.
Website: http://www.stanwayfountain.co.uk/
Sudeley Castle and Gardens
'The Queen of the Cotswolds', the garden at Sudeley Castle surrounds a fine Castle which was desecrated by Cromwell in the Civil War.
'The Queen of the Cotswolds', the garden at Sudeley Castle surrounds a fine Castle which was desecrated by Cromwell in the Civil War.
Designed as a continuation of the Castle, the inspiration for the gardens draws on and reflects Sudeley’s rich history. Eminent landscape designers including Lanning Roper, Rosemary Verey, Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall, Charles Chesshire and, more recently, Sir Roddy Llewellyn have all been involved in the design and layout of the gardens.
There are 14 acres, the highlight being the Queens Garden, built on an Elizabethan parterre and filled with old-fashioned roses. Don't miss the Tudor Knot Garden, Secret Garden and the Carp Pond next to the Tithe Barn. Some great topiary!
The Gardens are planted to appeal throughout the open season.
Website: http://www.sudeleycastle.co.uk/
Brantwood House and Gardens, Coniston
Brantwood has a series of unusual and experimental gardens laid out by John Ruskin from 1871 – 1886.
Working with the natural materials of the site, John Ruskin developed various themes within the ancient woodlands and up on the high moorland behind his home. Later exotic plantings were added C1900, remnants of which have survived nearly a century of neglect.
The renaissance of this unique garden at Brantwood House involves the restoration of its historic structure and ideas.
Recent projects include the restoration of a spectacular and colourful Victorian ‘viewing terrace’ and the adventurous renovation of Ruskin’s ‘Zig-Zaggy’ – which takes the visitor on an unexpected journey through Purgatory to Dante’s ‘Earthly Paradise’.
One of the loveliest sites in the Lake District, this dynamic garden provides plenty of fresh and thought-provoking ideas for everyone
Website: http://www.brantwood.org.uk/
Brockhole Garden and visitor centre
Brockhole has 30 acres of gardens and grounds, designed by Thomas Mawson 1898.
Brockhole Garden and Vistor Centre.
Formal Edwardian. Terraced garden with clipped box and yew hedges.
• Spring bulbs, rhododendrons and azaleas, magnolias and camellias
• Herbaceous and mixed borders
• Old fashioned and shrub roses
• Wildflower meadow
• Kitchen garden with fruit, vegetables, herbs and cut flowers. The acid soils and unusually mild microclimate mean that Brockhole gardens are the place to see unusual plants such as Eucryphias, Desontaniea (Chilean Holly), Cupressus cashmeriana (Kashmir cypress, Crinodendron hookerianum (Chilean lantern tree) and many more.
Website: http://www.lake-district.gov.uk/
Dalemain House and Gardens
Dalemain is a delightful Lake District Garden.
Just two miles from Ullswater, the sheltered Dalemain House Gardens, near Ullswater are a haven of tranquillity. Wander along the Georgian terrace border. Stroll in the Tudor knot garden. The Rose Walk with over 100 old-fashioned roses and ancient apple trees of named varieties,
leads to the Gazebo, set into the eighteenth-century garden wall.
In mid-summer the Gazebo is all but hidden behind a profusion of Clematis tangutica. Meander among the meconopsisin Dalemain's Low Garden or take a walk through shady Lob's Wood.
The historic house which dates from the 14th century is also open.
Whether you are a keen gardener or an enthusiastic amateur, you are sure to find many delights in Dalemain House Garden.
Website: Dalemain House & Gardens
Holehird Gardens, near Windermere
The gardens at Holehird are interesting at every season of the year. In early spring there is a magnificent display of field daffodils.
At Holehird Garden the full glory of the Lake District is in late spring when flowering trees and shrubs such as magnolias, rhododendrons and azaleas are at their best. The herbaceous borders and island beds in the walled garden take over ins ummer and continue into autumn with a brilliant and constantly changing kaleidoscope of colour. The National Collections of astilbes and hydrangeas are dazzling in late summer and autumn. Violas produces a late flush of flowers and shrub roses such as 'Bonica' continue flowering even to the end of the year. Beds of gentians produce their striking blue, backed by the brilliant folliage of spindle trees. Holehird is great!
If you want to know where other gardens are in the area check out the rest of our guide.
Holker Hall Gardens
The immaculately kept Gardens at Holker Hall (25 acres in all) are part woodland, part formal and essentially Victorian in character.
Holker Hall & Gardens - The 200 acre 'natural' parkland is the result of the late 18th century planting of Lord George Cavendish. In the early 19th century several new features were added: an arboretum, a conservatory, balustraded terraces by the House, and a large walled kitchen garden.
Lord and Lady Cavendish have sought not only to conserve the historic but have made changes and additions to the Gardens that are still being made today the old croquet lawn planted as a 'garden room' is one of the formal highlights of a visit to Holker Hall.
Hutton-in-the-Forrest
Hutton-in-the-Forest is a beautiful historic house with lovely gardens on the north eastern edge of the Lake District.
Hutton in the Forest House and Garden is surrounded by woodland of the medieval forest of Inglewood
There is a beautiful walled garden, built in the 1730s and this is the wonderful setting for a large collection of herbaceous plants.
The topiary terraces around the House which were laid out in the 17th century are the foundation for a Victorian woodland garden. The fine specimen trees and the 17th century dovecote form part of the Woodland walk.
The historic house with its fine rooms is also open and should not be missed It has been occupied by the same family since the 1650's
Website: Hutton in the Forest
Levens Hall Garden, near Kendal
The Topiary Gardens at Levens Hall are world-famous in their own right, and are a must for any visitor to the English Lake District.
Levens Hall Garden is an amazing place to visit in in Cumbria The gardener Monsieur Guillaume Beaumont, who had been trained under Le Nτtre at Versailles and who had laid out the gardens at Hampton Court started work in 1694 creating the design for the garden you can see today.
Under the magnificent topiary, depending on the time of your visit, you will find colourful Spring or Summer bedding. There is also a rose garden, a nuttery, fine herbaceous borders, and a fountain garden laid out with pleached limes to celebrate 300 years of the Gardens at Levens Hall.
Lowther Castle and Gardens
130 acres of lost gardens dating back 350 years set against the dramatic backdrop of a ruined early 19th century sandstone Lowther Castle, both in the process of restoration.
At the wonderful Lowther Castle and Garden there are broad lawns and wide paths, original garden buildings and features, and wilder areas, with beautiful mountain views from the west escarpment; wildlife including red squirrels and crested newts thrive.
Sizergh Castle and Garden
Sizergh Castle is surrounded by lovely grounds and park with specimen trees and woodland walks.
At Sizergh Castle there are many different features with formal terraces in the garden, herbaceous borders, wall plants and roses
There is a delightful wild flower meadow, a Dutch Garden and large limestone rock garden.
Moisture loving plants hug the sides of rocky streams and pools including the National Collection of four genera of hardy ferns.
The image shows one of the pools at Sizergh.
Take time to visit the historic castle with its fine wood panelling.
Events throughout the year plus activities for children. Sizergh Castle is a great day out for all the family.
Bluebell Arboretum and Nursery
One of the finest collections of unusual trees and shrubs in Derbyshire
British native trees were first planted at Bluebell Arboretum to provide much needed shelter on this site. Into the wood that this created were planted hundreds of the choice, rare and unusual plants in which our adjacent nursery specialises.
 
Although most of the large trees are still young, many of the shrubs and smaller trees already show their full beauty of form and habit and the arboretum has become a lovely woodland walk with rare plant treasures on display to entice the real enthusiast!
There are many educational signs/posters on display which give in depth information about the unusual plants in the gardens.
The garden is lovely all year round but particularly beautiful in late spring (Magnolias), summer and autumn (stunning autumn colour).
Website: Bluebell Arboretum and Nursery - Home Page, Bluebell Arboretum and Nursery - Garden Information
Burrows Garden, near Ashbourne
This is a beautiful collection of gardens set in 5 acres of stunning Derbyshire countryside.
The style of the garden varies with an Italian, Roman and Cornish element amongst many others. Whilst some of the garden is quite young, there are also many very established plantings set amongst very mature oak trees and impressive views.
There is a great use of iron work and statutory and there is undoubtedly something for everyone, whether you are a serious plants-person or someone who just enjoys the peace and tranquility of an immaculate and stunning garden. There are a number of unusual plants amongst the many raised beds, and the garden has recently been given the great accolade of being included in the 1000 Best Gardens in Britain.
Website: Burrows Gardens
Calke Abbey and Garden, near Derby
Altough the Gardens at Calke Hall are not extensive this National Trust property is a great day out
The gardens at Calke Abbey were laid out by Sir Harry Harpur and his son between 1770 & 1820. The last and perhaps largest has not yet been started.
The formal garden has good bedding and herbaceous borders and the Kitchen Garden provides a wide range of fruit and vegetables.
In the walled garden there is the only surviving Auricula theatre which was built to display these beautiful plants.
Combined with a visit to the House this is a great day out.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/calke/
Chatsworth House Gardens, Peak District
Chatsworth House and Gardens. A must visit for everyone!
Chatsworth House and Garden is set on the edge of The Peak District and is one of the most stunning gardens in the British Isles.
The Great Cascade was built in around 1700 and is now fully restored tumbling down the hillside, where children can paddle. This is a fantastic cascade and probably the longest in Britain.
There is so much more to see with fabulous rock garden with huge boulders, lakes and fountain, rose garden, kitchen garden, maze, kitchen garden.
Rest on the grassy hillside overlooking the lake and fountain. All in all a great day out for all the family.
The historic stately home is also open with paintings, antique furnishings, stupendous rooms, what more can we say.
Website: Chatsworth House and Garden
Haddon Hall & Garden
The beautiful gardens at Haddon Hall today are due mainly to the passion of Her Grace the 9th Duchess of Rutland.
When the 9th Duchess of Rutland arrived at Haddon Hall with her husband at the beginning of the 20th century, she encountered a garden overgrown and uncared for.
Yew trees were planted as well as herbaceous borders; climbing ivy was stripped from balustrades and climbing roses planted in their place. Haddon Hall is believed to have one of the most romantic gardens in Britain, the terraced rose gardens are glorious. Roses, clematis and delphiniums soften the harshness of the great stone buttresses and ancient walls of the house itself.
Hardwick Hall Gardens, near Chesterfield
The delightful gardens at Hardwick Hall were once the garden of Bess of Hardwick but only the walls and gazebo remain.
The gardens at Hardwick Hall, near Chesterfield in Derbyshire date from the 1870s with grass alleys bordered by yew and hornbeam hedges to protect them from the winds of the high escarpment.
There are 4 areas - orchard, lawn, nuttery and herb garden which convey the spirit of an Elizabethan garden. Lead statues in yew alcoves, holly domes, mulberry avenue, herbaceous borders all add interest.
Hardwick Hall, a beautiful period house which is famous for its tapestries is also open. Make sure you leave enough time to take a tour.
This is also a family friendly property with lots of kids activities throughout the year.
There are other historic properties near by which you can check out on our guide.
Website: Hardwick Hall Gardens
Kedleston Hall & Gardens, near Derby & Hotels
These pleasure grounds at Kedleston Hall, National Trust, were created by Lord Scarsdale with designs and buildings by Robert Adam. Between 1922 and 1924 some of the grounds and gardens at Kedlestone Hall were redesigned with help from Edward Lutyens and Gertrude Jekyll. Today the present plantings give an 18th century feel, with buildings and monuments including an Orangery.
There are fine trees, shrubs, azaleas and rhododendrons, roses, and good autumn tints.
The stunning house with Robert Adam's interiors is also open and a must see. It also houses Lord Curzon's Eastern museum with many objects from his time as Viceroy of India.
There is a 3.5 mile walk which gives extensive views.
Website: Kedleston Hall & Garden
Lea Gardens, near Matlock, Derbyshire
Lea Gardens is a unique collection of highly acclaimed rhododendrons, azaleas kalmias and other plants collected from the far corners of the world.
The Lea Gardens, near Matlock in Derbyshire are sited on the remains of a medieval millstone quarry and cover an area of approximately 4 acres (1.6ha) on a wooded hillside. The excellent rock Garden contain a huge variety of alpines with acers, dwarf conifers, heathers and spring bulbs.
Bird life has been encouraged in quiet woodland walks below the main gardens. This area, planted with ornamental trees and specie rhododendrons, contains many assorted bird-boxes donated by friends of Lea Gardens. The colours, scents and natural bird life can best be appreciated on a quiet weekday.
Melbourne Hall Garden, near Derby
As you walk through the Garden Gate at Melbourne Hall, the landscape garden takes your breath away.
Melbourne Hall Garden is the best surviving example of a garden in the manner of the famous designer Le Notre to be seen in England today.
The Garden dates from 1704 and was designed by Sir Thomas Coke who had studied architecture and Garden design in France.
Delightful avenues with statuary and fountains including the large urn known as the Four Seasons from Nost's foundry.
You cannot miss the famous bird cage arbour known as the Birdcage which is set by the mill lake.
There is the Yew Tunnel, and ponds, streams as well as good herbaceous borders. Terraces lead to the lake.
Website: Melbourne Hall Garden
Arlington Court and Garden
Arlington Court is hidden in a wooded valley on the edge of Exmoor.
Arlington Court and Garden - There is a Victorian garden complete with conservatory and ornamental pond. A partially restored kitchen garden which produces fruit, vegetables and flowers for the House and Tearoom. Stunning walks in the historic parkland including stream fed valleys and tranquil lake with heronry and bird hide.
In Spring there are lovely drifts of bulbs, followed by azaleas and rhododendrons.
Take time to visit the House including a great collection of shells. There is also a collection of over 50 horse drawn carriages.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/arlington-court/
Bicton Park Botanical Garden, near Exeter
Bicton Park has lovely gardens set in 50 acres near the sea.
The Bicton Park Garden is set in the lovely countryside near the South Devon Coast and dates back 300 years. The garden was once recognised as being one of the finest in England.
    One of the main features of the garden is the Palm House built in the 1820's which predates the one at Kew by 20 years. It is of semi circular design and sits against a brick wall, and uses 18,000 small glass panes in thin iron glazing bars.
The garden is set on a hillside between walls which leads down to formal water gardens in the shape of canals with fountains and a small stream, and a large lake.
There are rhododendrons and azaleas as well as colourful borders and feature gardens.
You can wander through the pinetum and arboretum with over 1,000 trees and 25 champion trees. The garden is do friendly and there are plenty of places to walk.
The large museum details changes in agricultural life over the last 2 centuries and should not be missed. A small railway runs around the garden which makes the garden a great day out with the family.
Website: Bicton Botanical Gardens
Buckland Abbey & Gardens, Yelverton, Dartmoor
Buckland Abbey on the edge of Dartmoor is hidden away in beautiful countryside and over recent years the gardens surrounding the property have been developed.
Part of the grounds at Buckland Abbey have been made into a medieval garden with a flowery mead. There are also formal beds and a lovely central pool.
A new Kitchen garden is looking impressive with a medieval garden and a flowery mead, or meadow.
Whilst not extensive the gardens are very pretty in the summer and form the perfect backdrop to the Abbey.
The historic Abbey home at one time to Sir Francis Drake is also open and well worth seeing with furnished rooms and galleries.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/buckland-abbey/
Budlake Old Post Office Garden, near Killerton House
Visit a beautiful cottage garden near to Killerton House
We like to feature some of the smaller gardens in Britain, especially cottage gardens and this one at Budlake Post Office near Killerton is a real delight. In the early 1950s when rationing was still in force it was put down entirely to vegetables and fruit by the Skerrett family , who also had a pig and chickens. The pig was fed the remains of the vegetable instead of being composted. Rationing ceased in 1954 and since then much of the garden has been changed back to a mixed cottage style which would have been popular at that time.
The garden is a real delight and just shows how much can be done on a small plot. The pig stye still remains as do some of the original buildings. It is maintained organically by a team of National Trust Volunteers.
 
See also the old style post office which closed in 1976
Website: Budlake Old Post Office Garden
Burrow Farm Gardens, near Axminister
If in Devon you must visit this beautifully landscaped ten acre garden created over the last forty years by Mary Benger.
The Burrows Farm Garden is a real gem with outstanding views over the Devon Countryside which blend so well with the garden. The courtyard and lower terrace garden is a great place to take in and admire the views. There are also lovely plantings of Wisteria, Roses, Geraniums and herbaceous plants. A rill flows quietly down the centre of the garden.
To the side of the garden is a wild flower area which leads to a walk through grasses which comes into its own in late summer.
And if you think this is enough there are acers for outstanding Autumn colour, and rhododendrons in early summer.
After this explore the landscaped grounds with more wild and formal areas, the lake and meadows which lead to a view point.
But when you think you have finished take a look at the upper terrace and Courtyard Garden with roses and more.
An outstanding garden not to be missed!
Website: http://www.burrowfarmgardens.co.uk/
Castle Drogo Garden, Dartmoor
This garden at Castle Drogo is within the grounds of a 20th century castle with magnificent views of the Teign valley.
Planned by George Dillistone. The Castle Drogo garden is a series of formal terraces and borders, with galleries round the sunken centre, serpentine paths, rose beds, arbours of yew. There are beautiful herbaceous borders full of old varieties of lupin, lychnis, campanulas, hollyhocks and red pokers. Under the granite walls are perennial and spring bulbs leading to terraces with yuccas, herbs, magnolias and a splendid croquet lawn. (croquet equipment for hire.
The castle (house) itself has an interesting history and it is well worth taking the time to see the interior. It was designed by the famous architect Lutyens who often worked with Gertrude Jekyll.
Website: Castle Drogo Gardens
Castle Hill Gardens, near Barnstaple
Welcome to Castle Hill, a beautiful Palladian house in its wondrous Grade 1 landscape in North Devon.
The Garden at Castle Hill is a Grade 1 landscape in North Devon. Share the romance of the Woodland Garden.
Wander through rare trees along tranquil paths where magnolias, camellias, rhododendrons and azaleas grow in abundance together with profusions of daffodils, bluebells and primroses.
Visit the Sham Castle with all round views to distant horizons before a peaceful descent brings you to the Millennium Garden, a summer haven of lavender and gentle colours.
Website: Castle Hill Gardens
Clovelly Court Gardens
Clovelly Court Garden is a classic example of a lovingly restored Victorian walled kitchen garden
Clovelly Court Gardens - Peaches, apricots, nectarines, vines (including muscat grapes), citrus fruit, figs, cucumbers, peppers, chillies, aubergines and tomatoes can be bought in season, together with cut flowers and pot plants from the nursery.
Espalier fan and cordon fruit trees line the walls enclosing the garden, which also shelter vegetables grown to organic principles and in rotation, ensuring sweet tasting and wholesome produce for sale.
The unique maritime microclimate of the garden is produced by the effects of the warm Gulf Stream flowing past Clovelly, which with its enviable sheltered position in the Bristol Channel allows the growth of tender and exotic plants.
On your stroll through the garden on a fine day, you may also enjoy a great view across Bideford Bay.
Coleton Fishacre House and Garden, near Dartmouth
Coleton Fishacre is a beautiful 24 acre garden created by Rupert and Lady Dorothy D'Olyly Carte in the 1920s.
In the spring and early summer at Coleton Fishacre Gardens wild flowers abound amid Rhododendrons, camellias and azaleas, planted among tender and exotic plants which thrive in the subtropical climate.
Formal terraces and walled garden provide summer long interest. Paths descend the informal wooded valley to the coastal path and lookout.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/coleton-fishacre/
Dartington Hall Gardens, near Totnes
A truly magnificent landscape garden most of which has been created in the 20th century, at the rear of Dartington Hall.
Dartington Hall has a woodland garden with rhododendrons, azaleas, magnolias has been set round a series of clever terraces on the steep hillside.
There are magnificent trees, a Japanese Garden, borders all of which are meticulously maintained.
Beatrix Farrand designed the Courtyard and helped with the woodland glades.
Rest a while and take in the unusual surroundings. Truly a great garden to visit.
Spring and early summer are the best time to visit.
I was really not expecting this fantastic landscape garden which is not as well known as it should be.
Website: https://www.dartington.org/
Greenway House & Gardens, near Brixham
Greenway House and Gardens were once the family home of Agatha Christie.
Greenway House and Garden is surrounded by a glorious woodland garden on the banks of the Dart Estuary in Devon.
Beautiful in all seasons and renowned for rare half-hardy plants under planted with native wild flowers, Greenway has an atmosphere of wildness and timelessness.
This true 'secret' garden of peace and tranquillity with wonderful views, is set within an extensive estate and associated with many fascinating characters.
The house, set in the 1950s must also be seen with many of the families and furnishings including collections of botanical chima, silver and more
The garden can be reached from Dartmouth by public river boat.
Website: Greenway Gardens
Hartland Abbey Gardens
Hartland Abbey & Gardens were given by Henry VIII to the Keeper of his Wine Cellar whose descendants live here today.
Visit Hartland House and Gardens a gem in the Devon countryside.
It has fascinating interiors, beautiful 18thC Walled and Woodland Gardens, Bog Garden and Fernery by Gertrude Jekyll. Since 1914 dense undergrowth had hidden much of the garden but now entrances visitors once again with its winding paths, bulbs, camellias, rhododendrons, hydrangeas and stunning Walled Gardens of tender and rare plants inc echium pininana.
Walk to the Atlantic cove at Blackpool Mill, the location for 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'The Shell Seekers'; enjoy the snowdrops, primroses, ferns, daffodils, bluebells and foxgloves in early spring. Peacocks and guinea fowl roam at will; donkeys and Welsh Mountain sheep graze the Park.
Website: Hartland Abbey
Hill House Nursery and Garden
Hill House Garden - Set amongst rolling Devon Countryside this 3 acre garden surrounds a charming one time vicarage.
It was made famous by Edward Hyams a great garden writer & plantsman in the 1960s. The garden has been restored by the Hubbard family and has many unusual plants and a lovely, old English vicarage garden atmosphere.
To view on request is a 'temple' which Edward Hyams bought from a junk shop more than 50 years ago and installed on the side lawn, looking down over the Rhododendron walk.
This garden is worth a visit combined with time spent at the Hill House Plant Nursery which is outstanding and received lavish praise from Roy Lancaster in The Garden magazine.
Website: Hill House Garden and Nursery
Hotel Endsleigh Garden, Tavistock
Endsleigh Garden was designed and created by Humphrey Repton in 1814. Today the visitor can enjoy Repton's vision for the gardens with its streams, rills, pools and cascades splashing through valleys of Champion Trees. Closer to the house, a cottage orne style hunting lodge, you will find a 100m herbaceous border, Rose arch and Yew walk.
Website: http://www.hotelendsleigh.com
Killerton House Gardens, near Exeter
Killerton House is beautiful hillside garden for all seasons set in the rolling devon countryside.
Killerton House and Gardens near Exeter are surrounded by beautiful parkland in one of the most beautiful Devonshire countryside settings.
There is something for every season here with early spring flowering bulbs, magnolias, azaleas, herbaceous borders and great autumn colours.
Killerton is a plantsman's paradise with rare trees and shrubs from all around the world collected by the Veitch family.
The Summer Borders to the side and front of the house are a mass of colour in the summer.
There is an early 19th century summer house, the fascinating Bears Hut decorated with pine cones, ice house and rock garden.
Take time to visit the 18th century house with its great collection of historic costumes.
Website: Killerton House and Gardens
Knightshayes Court Garden, near Tiverton
The beautiful Knightshayes Court also has beautiful gardens in the heart of the Devon countryside
Knightshayes Court and Garden are situated in the beautiful Devon countryside near Tiverton a historic market town.
Edward kemp designed this 50 acre garden but it owes much to the Amory family who devoted themselves to its development.
This property will be of interest to those not only with an interest in gardens but also to those with a love of historic houses.
There are formal terraces and summer flowering borders providing drifts of colours, a topiary fox and hounds, and a tranquil lily pool.
The gardens extend into the ' garden of wood ' of rare trees which is magical all the year round. Spring bulbs abound from March to May.
Website: Knightshayes Court
Lukesland Garden
Lukesland Gardens, described in the Good Gardens Guide as ‘one of the finest gardens of its type in the South West’, offers the visitor 24 acres of flowering shrubs, rare trees and wild flowers.
The garden at Lukesland lie in the beautiful valley of the Addicombe Brook, which cascades down from Dartmoor through ponds and over waterfalls towards the River Erme. At Lukesland the acid Dartmoor soil and mild climate of South Devon provide ideal conditions for a fine collection of camellias, rhododendrons and azaleas, some dating back to the original Victorian planting. Lukesland also has 4 Champion and over 40 Notable trees on the National Tree Register, many in its fascinating pinetum.
Website: http://www.lukesland.co.uk/
Marwood Hill Garden, near Barnstaple
Marwood Hill Garden isone of the finest in Devon and a must visit!
Marwood Hill Gardens are delightful and cover 20 acres with many plant collections and year round interest created by Dr Jimmy Smart MBE VMH when he moved there in 1949.
Upper Garden - Camellias and rhododendrons are planted on the walk along the north side of the walled garden, including 3 borders of herbaceous peonies.
Lower Garden - The path to this garden with its small lakes passes plantings of bamboo. The Bog garden houses a superb National collection of Astilbes.
For those who like trees there are 22 at Marwood including several Eucalyptus.
The gardens are wildlife friendly with Kingfishers regular visitors to the lake, woodpiles are provided for insects, and plants to attract butterflys.
During the year the Garden holds many events including outdoor theatre, garden talks by well known gardeners
Website: Marwood Hill Garden
Overbecks Garden, National Trust, Devon
Overbecks Gardens are well worth seeing.
This lovely coastal garden at Overbecks has stunning views of the Salcombe Estuary and is set just above the coastal path.
This amazing small garden is very sheltered and is home to a wide range of Sub Tropical plants including many palm trees.
Lovely herbaceous borders full of colour, sub tropical border and other interesting shrubs and plants. Plenty of areas to sit and take in the views and atmosphere of the garden.
Interesting museum in Edwardian House which has a secret room for children with dolls, tin soldiers and other toys. See the inventions by eccentric scientist Otto Overbeck.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/overbecks/
Rosemoor Garden RHS
Whatever the season, Rosemoor is a unique place that people return to time and again for ideas, inspiration or simply to enjoy a marvellous day out.
RHS Rosemoor Garden is a great place to visit in all seasons.
From Lady Anne’s original garden to the Rose Garden’s (with over 2000 roses), the Fruit and Vegetable Garden , the Arboretum,Lake and Bog Garden , there is something for everyone to enjoy.
Rosemoor also holds over 80 exciting events throughout the year including horticultural talks, walks and demonstrations, children’s workshops, family events, musical and dramatic performances and many more!
Website: https://www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/rosemoor
Saltram House and Gardens
Set on the outskirts of Plymouth this magnificent house is surrounded by 20 acres of Parkland.
The garden at Saltram House is mainly woodland with some lovely trees including a fine Lime avenue bordered by Bluebells in the Spring.
There is a good collection of rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias and magnolias.
The Garden is at its best in the Spring with narcissi and other spring bulbs.
Peaceful formal pond area with backdrop of fine trees and shrubs.
Fine Orangery and classical garden house named Fanny's Bower.
Website: Saltram House and Gardens
Tapeley Park Gardens
Tapeley Gardens in North Devon is certainly one for your diary. Take a look.
Tapeley Park Gardens offer beautiful terraces with tender plants, an Ilex tunnel, a thriving Permaculture garden, a straw bale house and a bountiful walled kitchen garden.Walk to the woods to the lake where the largest Thulia trees can be seen.
The views from the front lawn are right across to Lundy Island, weather permitting and across the bay to Saunton Sands which also belongs to the Estate.
Website: Tapeley Park Gardens
The Garden House, Devon
Set amidst beautiful South Devon landscape on the edge of Dartmoor, this 8 acre garden at The Garden House includes a romantic terraced walled garden surrounding the ruins of a 16th century vicarage.
The Garden House set on the edge of Dartmoor in Devon is one of the most delightful gardens in England.
Packed with plants and colours for all seasons, it is well worth visiting most of the year.
This is not a small garden and many paths lead you through a range of borders with surprises and colour at every turn.
The Wild garden is in an informal setting and the walled garden with tower is magnificent where you can get great views of the landscape.
Website: The Garden House, Devon
Thorn House and Gardens
Thorn garden covers an area of nine acres, including an area of natural woodland.
Thorn Garden also has a growing collection of azaleas, camellias and rhododendrons, tree heaths and heathers, hydrangeas, red hot pokers (Kniphofia), and holds a collection of trees from around the world of interest to serious dendrologists and general tree-lovers alike.
Trees from South America, such as the beautiful evergreen Gevuina avellana (Chilean hazel) can flourish, and grow to the large size of the magnificent specimen present in the garden today.
Website: Thorn House Garden
Abbotsbury Gardens, near Weymouth
Superb sub tropical Abbotsbury Gardens set in beautiful coastal location close to Chesil Beach.
The gardens at Abbotsbury are situated in a valley near the chesil Beach and date from 1762. The sheltered position has enabled sub tropical plants to grow among our native species  Formal areas lead to the Valley Garden, a gentle coombe with camellias,
magnolias and rhododendrons in woodland. Asiatic primroses border the the banks of the stream in Spring with bridges and crossing paths. Even in summer the woodland has colour.
There are many fine specimen trees which you would not see growing in this country. These are gardens which you should not miss and one of our favourites.
Each year in October the plants and trees are illuminated in a dazzling display of colours.
Website: http://abbotsbury-tourism.co.uk/gardens/
Athelhampton House and Garden, near Dorchester
The formal gardens at Athelhampton House were built in 1891 by Alfred Cart de Lafontaine.
The Athelhampton House and Garden, near Dorchester is situated in rolling Dorset countryside near the historic town of Dorchester.
Francis Inigo Thomas designed four Ham stone courts in the Elizabethan style with a series of ponds and a formal canal.
Spring - Snowdrops and narcissi to hybrid hyacinths, camellias, magnolias, tulips.
Summer - Roses, subtropical plants, herbs and many more.
Autumn - Lovely autumn colours, and spectacular red vines along the walls.
Website: http://www.athelhampton.co.uk/
Bennetts Water Garden, near Weymouth
This 8 acre site known as Bennetts Water Gardens has been landscaped to create a tranquil walk around numerous lakes with many places to sit and unwind.
At Bennetts Water Garden you will see one of the most outstanding displays of water lilies in Britain with 150 varieties blooming throughout the summer.
Pond and moisture loving plants grow to enormous sizes, there  are also wild plants and flowers.
Dragonflies, Herons and Kingfishers can be seen.
The Tropical House contains exotic plants including a cacti collection and a Family Nature Trail keeps young visitors interested.
Website: http://www.bennettswatergardens.com/
Compton Acres Gardens,near Poole
Compton Acres has 10 acres of gardens with lovely views over Poole Harbour and the distant Purbeck Hills.
The historic Compton Acres Gardens near Poole include formal areas and woodland areas which were superbly designed and have been brought back to life by the present owners.
As you enter the gardens you will see the superb Italian Garden with ornamental lake and water lillies surrounded by colourful formal borders bursting with colour..
Compton Acres has one of the largest rock gardens in the UK and a stunning Japanese Garden with thatched temple, pond and koi. The gardens look stunning in Spring and Summer with lovely reflections.
Other features include the Palm Court, and the Spanish water garden.
The woodland garden makes good use of water features including pools and small cascades and bridges.
The gardens have been restored over recent years and are worth visiting. Worth making more than one visit through the changing seasons.
Website: http://www.comptonacres.co.uk/
Cranborne Manor and Gardens, near Wimborne
This delightful garden surrounds the ancient Cranborne Manor House set in the beautiful Dorset countryside.
Cranborne Manor Gardens is surely one of the most beautiful gardens in Dorset.
As you approach the house from the Garden centre there is a fine avenue of trees which once led to the front of the Manor House. The courtyard before the house has a wonderful steel water-lilly sculpture by Angela Connor.
To the side you will enter the walled garden with its colourful borders, down one side bordering a small orchard. On the other side there is a lovely rose garden and further along a vegetable garden.
At the back of the house is the 'White Garden' very much the same as it was in the 19th century.
Lots more interest with a Sundial Garden, herb garden, and small herbaceous garden and a stream running through the grounds.
This garden has evolved over the years, each generation adding their bit. Les Dinan, the head gardener presides. With his brother Chris, he is responsible for it being the garden it is today.
Website: http://www.cranborne.co.uk/shop-visit/the-manor-garden.html
One of Dorset's finest places to visit is Kingston Lacy House and Gardens. Following extensive restoration explore the 17th century formal gardens, avenues and tree nursery, which burst into life during the spring and summer months, with a spectacular display of azalea, camellia, rhododendron and flowering cherry trees.
As you explore see the vision created by Henrietta Bankes whose imagination and determination created Lady’s Walk, the Fernery and the Japanese Garden. Visit the restored Victorian Kitchen Garden with its glasshouses and Community Growing Spaces.
In the New Year enjoy the fantastic display of snowdrops, daffodils and bluebells.
From March to October join a guided garden tour and discover the history of the house and gardens. Tours run Wednesday – Sunday, please check the board in the Rose Garden for times.
Snowdrop displays from late January are worth seeing.
Do not forget to explore the house brimming with treasures. Browse the Egyptian room and discover our vast range of paintings including pictures by Rubens and Van Dyck.
Website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/kingston-lacy/
These lovely gardens at Kingston Maurward, near Dorchester and in the Dorset countryside are a real delight. They are set amongst 35 acres of classical 18th century parkland, and lawns sweeping down majestically to the lake.
The Edwardian Gardens include a croquet lawn, herbaceous borders and a large display of tender perennials including the National Collections of Penstemons and Salvias.
The walled demonstration garden is planted with a superb collection of hedges and plants suitable for growing in Dorset. One mile long nature trail.
The Animal Park at Kingston Maurward is well worth a visit.
Website: Kingston Maurward Gardens
Knoll Gardens and Nursery, near Wimborne
Knoll Garden - the UK’s leading ornamental grass specialist, with ten Chelsea Gold Medals to its name, this four acre garden also features a range of stunning flowering perennials and a collection of rare and unusual trees and shrubs from around the world. Spring brings the vibrant colours of the poppies that positively ‘zing’ against the fresh green of the grasses as the garden wakes up.
Euchryphia, Hohena, Hydrangea and Mrytle offer exquisite flowers in high summer, and a fragrant home to many birds and insects. Autumn is the peak season for grasses and many deciduous woody plants. With stunning autumn colours the fruit and foliage of the spindle trees, maidenhair and Persian ironwood all combine to sumptuous effect. And as the year draws to a close, sparkling frosts and limpid winter sunshine bring drama to the gardens with the sight of the backlit towering miscanthus long remembered by visitors.
Website: Knoll Gardens, https://www.facebook.com/pages/Knoll-Gardens/146334462091346?ref=ts&fref=ts
Mapperton House Garden, near Beaminster 
Mapperton Garden is set hidden away in the most beautiful Dorset countryside.
Mapperton House & Garden is tucked away deep in the beautiful Dorset countryside.
On the upper level, close to the house, is the Italianate garden laid out by Ethel Labouchere in her husband's memory in the 1920s, complete with grottoes, stone ornamental birds and animals and a fountain court.
Below the wall and summer house are 17th century fish ponds. An orangery was added by Victor Montagu, former MP for South Dorset, who extended the lower garden with specimen shrubs and trees in the 1950s.
There is a lovely streamside walk which is lovely at all times especially the spring - they lead to a Magnolia walk and then back around to the formal gardens.
Website: Mapperton Gardens
Minterne Garden, near Dorchester
Not that well known but Minterne Garden is a real gem tucked away in the Dorset countryside
Wander peacefully through 20 acres at Minterne Gardens, which is tucked away in the beautiful Dorset Countryside.
The majority of plants here originate from plant hunters who toured the world between 1850 and 1950.
This is a beautiful place where magnolias and rhododendrons tower over small streams in Spring. Later, eurcryphias, hydrangeas and water lilies provide a new vista at each turn with ducks on the small lakes and cascades.
You can either follow the lower garden walk, or take the upland walk which gives superb views across the densely planted valley.
In the background is the magnificent stone house (not open to the public)
Spring is a brilliant time to visit but the gardens will give pleasure any time.
This is one of our favourite Gardens in Dorset.
Website: Minterne Gardens
Snape Cottage Plantsman's Garden
Made on a sheltered south-facing slope with superb views, it is planned for all-the-year interest, with exciting collections of snowdrops, hellebores, pulmonarias, auriculas, hardy geraniums, dianthus, iris and asters.Snowdrops in February - over 300 different varieties.
Website: http://www.snapecottagegarden.co.uk/
The Blue Pool
The Blue Pool Wareham is a hidden gem.
The Blue Pool -I should point out it is not a garden in the formal sense as there are no special plantings. It is however surrounded by natural British Fauna with sprinklings of rhododendrons and azaleas. Birdsong abounds around the pool which is fed only by rainwater. The colours of the pool change constantly due to the minerals.
There are many places to sit to enjoy the serenity of this place and tracks lead to different viewpoints.
Website: The Blue Pool in Dorset
The Priests House Garden
Take yourself back 40 years in this delightful small garden situated behind the Priests House in Wimborne.
The Priest's House garden is worked by a team of volunteers who have worked really hard to make this garden so attractive.
Sited on a long narrow plot with a central path the garden is divided into sections. All the usual plantings you would expect to see including herbaceous borders, herb garden, roses and plenty of places to sit to take in the atmosphere. Look out for the 200 year old black mulberry tree.
Website: http://www.priest-house.co.uk/

Thomas Hardy's Cottage Garden

Hardy's Cottage and Garden is nestled down a country lane amongst woodland in the Dorset countryside is the historic cottage and garden where one of the most famous novelists and poets in the world was born and where he spent his younger years.
Thomas Hardy is famous for novels such as 'Far from the Madding Crowd' and Tess of the d'Urbevilles.
The garden is worth visiting combined with a visit to the cottage which is also open.
There is a Thomas Hardy exhibition at the County Museum in Dorchester.
Website: Hardy's Cottage and Garden
Crook Hall and Gardens, Durham
Just a few minutes walk from Durham’s busy market place, Crook Hall and Gardens is a haven of peace and tranquillity.
Crook Hall is a beautiful medieval manor house with lovely gardens, famously haunted by the White Lady, is surrounded by ten romantic garden rooms, each having its own unique style and atmosphere.
The secret walled gardens described as ‘a tapestry of colourful blooms’ by Alan Titchmarsh are relaxed and lush, with cottage garden borders providing a riotous mass of colour. In contrast the Shakespeare garden is crammed with heavily scented Elizabethan plants, and the moat pool is a place to sit and reflect while watching the fish and blue damselflies.
Audley End House and Garden, near Saffron Walden
Audley End is a glorious Jacobean stately home owned by English Heritage.
The kitchen garden at Audley End House and Garden is based on Victorian times with produce used by the household.
But what makes this garden unique is that it is cultivated organically, the produce ending up in the organic shop for visitors to buy, rather than on the banqueting table.
HDRA, the organic organisation, began restoring the overgrown and semi- derelict garden with English Heritage on the 1st January 1999, and the garden was opened to the public just three months later.
Three acres of spacious and peaceful gardens in a historic rural setting, beautifully extended and revived in the last few years.
Beeleigh Abbey Gardens - Mature trees surround a variety of planting and water features: woodland walks underplanted with bulbs leading to the tidal River Chelmer, a cottage garden, an extensive formal garden filled with David Austin roses, a young orchard and wild flower meadow, a wisteria walk, and stunning 85 yard long mixed herbaceous borders. Specimen trees include Magnolia, Tulip and Indian Bean. The extensive lawn has the scenic backdrop of the remains of a 12th century abbey incorporated into a mainly 17th century private residence (not open to garden visitors).
Beth Chatto Garden, near Colchester
The Beth Chatto Gardens began in 1960 when the site was an overgrown wasteland between two farms.
Faced with all kinds of difficult conditions Beth and Andrew Chatto set out to find homes for many of the plants they wished to grow. With dry and damp soil in both sun and shade, they were able put into practice the underlying principles of what is now referred to as "Ecological gardening". There is a series of 4 gardens - Scree, Gravel, Woodland and Water all with lush leafy plantings of Gunnera, Eupatorium, Phormium and impressive Miscanthus around a series of natural ponds.
Easton Lodge Garden
The Easton Lodge Garden is set in 23 acres and is well worth a visit
In 1865, when she was 3, Frances Evelyn Maynard inherited Easton Lodge and Garden. She married at 21, became the Countess Of Warwick ('Darling Daisy'), established a great Country House, devised spectacular and varied gardens, and entertained with massive, suicidal, abandon. Her much publicised friendship with the Prince Of Wales, A frequent guest at Easton, was the scandal of the day.
Today the Easton Lodge gardens are being restored with great success, ponds, rose walk, herbaceous borders and plenty more set in 23 acres.
Green Island Gardens, near Colchester
Green Island Garden near Colchester is one for your diary
The Green Island Gardens were laid out in 1997 after much of the old orchard originally of Ardleigh Park was cleared. Only Cotinus coggygria 'Atroppurpuea' remains from the original overgrown beds. The borders are edged by timber logs all from fallen trees in the woodland.
Planting is designed to give all year round interest although they really peak from late June onwards and provide colour and interest through autumn and winter. Magnolia grandiflora 'Gallisonae', Pittoporums, Hoheria sexytylosa 'Stardust', Clerodendron trichotomum, Acers and Phormiums providing the structure. A Pawlonia tomentosa coppiced annually in February creates a magnificent focal point by August each year.
Marks Hall Gardens and Arboretum
A tree collection from all the temperate areas of the world set in more than 200 acres of historic landscape and gardens provides interest and enjoyment throughout the year at Marks Hall Garden.
Follow the paths through the Marks Hall Garden and Arboretum, where you can see beautiful vistas and a host of exotic trees from around the world.
Highlights include the Millennium Walk, designed for structure, colour and scent on the shortest days of the year; the largest planting in Europe of Wollemi Pine and the inspired combination of traditional and contemporary planting in the 18th Century Walled Garden.
This impressive Garden combines the best of contemporary and traditional design and includes both long established shrubs and interesting new plantings. The double border is the longest in East Anglia.
Beyond the Gardens and Arboretum, there are woodland walks where wildlife abounds, many species having survived on this site for hundreds of years.
RHS Garden Hyde Hall
RHS Hyde Hall - a great garden created on a very difficult site.
RHS Hyde Hall a great garden creation.
In 1955 when Dr and Mrs Robinson came to Hyde Hall there were only six trees on the top of a windswept hill and no garden. If they had known then what they soon learned, it is very doubtful that the garden would have been made!
The site was cold and windy, the top of the hill was covered in gravel and the soil on the slopes comprised a sticky clay.
The Hyde Hall site has been transformed to include a lovely Spring Garden, lake, a National Collection of Viburnum, roses and so much more.
The Gibberd Garden
The Gibberd Garden is recognised as an important contribution to 20th century garden design.
Sir Frederick Gibberd was appointed master planner of Harlow New Town in 1946. He designed and made his garden on the outskirts of Harlow from the late 1950’s until his death in 1984.
It is a highly individual creation, sited on the side of a small valley, which slopes down to Pincey Brook. It was planned as a series of rooms each with its own character.
The glades, groves, pools and alleys provide settings for some 50 sculptures, large ceramic pots, architectural salvage, a gazebo and a moated castle.
BARNSLEY HOUSE AND GARDEN
Barnsley House has a beautiful small garden of 4 acres created by the late Rosemary Verey one of the 20th's centuries most famous designers.
The Barnsley House Garden was redesigned by Rosemary Verey who helped design a border at Prince Charles's Garden at Highgrove. Visitors from all over the world still visit here.
Featured on television many times, the garden surrounds a splendid Cotswold stone house which is now a hotel.
Gardens within gardens, colourful borders, knot garden, lime walk and Kitchen garden all carefully designed to fit in with the landscape.
There is plenty of colour all year round but many think it is at it's best in late Spring.
Not to be missed if you are in the Cotswolds.
BATSFORD ARBORETUM, NEAR MORETON ON MARSH
Batsford Arboretum is set in 56 acres of lovely Cotswold Countryside and contains over 1500 trees with species from all over the world.
Batsford Arboretum has beautiful colours throughout the year, snowdrops in winter, followed by daffodils and then marvellous displays from the Cherries and Magnolias in spring.
In summer see the bamboo groves, fine bronze statues and waterside plantings.
It all comes together in Autumn with glorious Autumn tints and great colours.
It is worth allocating around 2 hours to your visit here and don't miss the Garden Terrace Cafe, Garden Shop and lovely Plant Centre.
BOURTON HOUSE GARDEN, NEAR MORETON ON THE MARSH
An award-winning three acre garden high on the Cotswolds with wonderful views over the surrounding countryside.
The Bourton House Garden, near Moreton on the Marsh features imaginative topiary (including knot garden, walk and parterre), magnificent wide herbaceous borders filled with rare, unusual and exotic plants, several water features (including a raised Basket Pond from the Great Exhibition of 1851) and many creatively planted pots.  The garden is always beautiful but absolutely glorious in the summer months and early autumn.
CAMERS GARDEN
The 4 acre garden surrounds an Elizabethan farmhouse (not open) on the Cotswolds escarpment with fine views over the Severn of the Welsh mountains.
It is divided into a range of areas both formal and informal which are planted with a very wide range of species to give interest throughout the year Includes parterre, topiary, Japanese garden, bog shade and prairie areas, white and hot gardens, waterfalls and woodland walks.
CERNEY HOUSE GARDEN
This secret Cotswold garden at Cerney House, high above the lovely Churn Valley is a very special and friendly place.
The walled garden at Cerney House has a lovely atmosphere and you can admire the plants as well as listening to the birdsong from the surrounding woods.
See the old fashioned roses along the trellis, herbaceous borders and wonderful scents. In April there are lovely displays of tulips joining the last of some very special daffodils.
There is a well labelled  herb garden and working kitchen garden. Colourful rockery. The 3.5 acre red brick walled garden has many colourful borders and seating areas.
In Spring  wander through the Bluebell woods down to the front garden which has more colourful borders.
COLESBOURNE PARK SNOWDROPS
The snowdrop collection at Colesbourne Park originated in the plantings made by Henry John Elwes (1846-1922).
In 1874 Henry Elwes had discovered Galanthus elwesiis while travelling in western Turkey and he became one of the prominent galanthophiles of his day.
It is clear that he planted widely, as the Colesbourne Park garden today contains large populations of snowdrops, many of them hybrids, descended from those plantings.
New cultivars have been added to the collection each year, with the collection now totalling some 250 cultivars.
HANHAM COURT GARDENS
The Hanham Court Gardens are at the rear of a Court House with 13th Century church and tithe Barn once part of a monastic foundation.
The garden at Hanham Court has been restored and developed superbly over recent years by Chelsea Gold Medalist designers Julian and Isabel Bannerman who have now moved on.
These gardens have been superbly designed and are at their best in mid summer.
The main avenue is bordered by beautifully planted herbaceous and rose borders, split into different sections. Sculptured topiary borders give height and an interesting dimension to the borders. 
Paths take you along further borders with dazzling displays of roses and peonies.
Nearer the house there are gravel borders with lavender, and masses of planted pots. But there is much more with a pool, woodland glade, stumpery, wildflower meadows rounded off by a visit to the tearoom make for a great visit.
HIDCOTE MANOR GARDEN
The Hidcote Manor Garden should not be missed. It is situated in the beautiful Cotswold countryside amongst hills, rolling valleys, and drystone walls.
Hidcote comprises of a  series of small gardens within a garden,  but also with long avenues bordered by different plantings. The garden is famous for rare shrubs and trees as well as its outstanding design features. There are water features, wild flower areas and pools with plenty of places to sit and take in the atmosphere.
See the long herbaceous borders which gives a great splash of colour from July and
walk amongst the old scented roses along the walkway and small garden houses.
HIGHGROVE HOUSE GARDENS
 ‘The Gardens At Highgrove, Gloucestershire HRH The Prince of Wales has spent 30 years transforming the grounds of Highgrove into what have been acknowledged as some of the most inspired and innovative gardens in the United Kingdom. His Royal Highness’s strict adherence to organic and sustainable methods has helped create gardens which are both magical and intriguing while being environmentally sound; encouraging both plants and wildlife to thrive.
HIGHNAM COURT GARDENS
The gardens at Highnam Court surround several large lakes, with walkways around them. They are bordered by beds planted with thousands of plants to give colour  and interest in all seasons. Whilst many of the plantings are still young becoming established there is much to see.
In Spring there are thousands of daffodils throughout the grounds, planted together with other spring bulbs to give a tremendous show.
There are many different sections including the Broad Walk and rose tunnel, a Knot Garden, a Wisteria walk and much more.
KELMSCOTT MANOR GARDENS, NEAR LECHLADE
Kelmscott Manor was the home of William Morris famous for his textile designs.
Before venturing out into the small garden at Kelmscott Manor, near Lechlade take time to read the Garden leaflet which gives it history. This will make your visit more enjoyable.
William Morris loved this garden which has been recreated using many of the plants which he loved and from which many of his designs came.
The mulberry garden is dominated by the original tree which was there in 1921. This leads to a small orchard with varieties of Victorian apples. The lashed fencing has been copied from original photos.
The garden is worth visiting if combined with a visit to the Manor which house many of William Morris's designs. It also houses some of his furnitue and paintings and was used as a summer house.
KIFTSGATE COURT GARDENS, NEAR CHIPPING CAMPDEN
Kiftsgate Court Gardens are magnificently situated garden on the edge of the Cotswold escarpment with views towards the Malvern Hills.
The gardens planted around the late 19th century  Kiftsgate House are planted to give harmonious colour schemes, whilst the sheltered lower garden is home to more tender plants. Heather Muir created the garden from sloping woods and was helped by. Heather was helped  by her lifelong friend Lawrence Johnston who created Hidcote just 1 mile away. Since then the Garden has been developed and improved by two more women gardeners, the present one being Anne Chambers.
Walk down steep paths to a beautiful pool on a terrace which is hidden from the rest of the garden, with the most fantastic views over the Cotswolds as well as plenty of places to sit to take in the atmosphere.
There are tulips in the Spring, but the roses are the true highlight of the garden - scrambling over trees and shrubs, but more formal ones too!
LYDNEY SPRING GARDENS
Set in beautiful countryside the Lydney Spring Gardens are in an enchanted secluded wooded valley with lakes and a profusion of rhododendrons, azaleas, magnolias and other flowering shrubs and trees.
Lydney Spring Garden is a great place to visit in Spring and early summer. Various paths take you through the woods which are full of colour from the many displays of trees and shrubs.
The garden is a delightful oasis with plenty of birdsong and places to sit make this a really peaceful oasis on a sunny day.
There is a small formal garden with lovely views over the Severn Estuary.
Make sure you also have time to see the Roman Temple remains, site museum, and small NZ  exhibition.
MILL DENE GARDEN, MORETON ON THE MARSH
Mill Dene Garden, hidden in the Cotswolds.
Why not take a visit to Mill Dene Garden in the Cotswolds.
Fifty shades of...green and much more: cream teas by the millpond, plant sales and an unusual garden created over the years by the owner. In the two and a half acre garden there's a stream with grotto, a cricket lawn with tiny pavilion (much loathed by Rosemary Verey!) and a herb garden which has the church as a backdrop.
MISARDEN PARK GARDENS, NEAR CIRENCESTER
Misarden Park has a lovely 12 acre gardens set around 17th century Manor house - not open.
Misarden Park Gardens are in  a stunning situation 700 feet above sea level at head of Golden Valley.
There is a beautiful Spring Walk with naturalised bulbs and flowering trees. See great displays of tulips from mid April and a wonderful wisteria ( end of April ) which cloaks the front of the House.
The formal gardens look beautiful in summer with large herbaceous borders, rill and fountain.
Fine topiary avenue which takes you down to the House with more formal areas either side.
NEWARK PARK GARDENS AND SNOWDROPS, NATIONAL TRUST
Newark Park set deep in the Gloucestershire, on the edge of the Cotswolds is a hidden gem.
Every year in February and early March at Newark Park there are beautiful displays ofsnowdrops and aconites. Not only this but there are breathtaking views and beautiful scenery. Follow paths down to the boating house or take some of the longer walks within the estate. At the time of adding this entry dogs on leads are allowed in the grounds.
The house ( a hunting lodge is normally open from March ) and is worth seeing.
During the rest of the year the gardens are not extensive but are worth a visit for those visiting the House
PAINSWICK ROCOCO GARDEN
Painswick Rococo Garden is a unique 18th century garden set in a hidden valley with lovely views of the surrounding countryside.
Painswick Rococo Garden is set on the edge of the Ctswolds. The term 'Rococo Garden' is associated with garden design  from 1720 to 1760.
Its restoration began in 1984 and much of it is now set out in its original form.
A rarely seen 'Exedera' or seating area or place to pass the time of day is set out at the end of the unusually placed vegetable area.
The Red House - pictured above is another focal point and is still in its original colour.
There is a fascinating combination of  woodland walks, vistas, a large kitchen garden which has been restored.
RODMARTON MANOR
A stunning courtyard garden..
Rodmarton Manor is an Arts and Crafts House with a beautiful garden. The courtyard is divided into many sections with lovely plantings and colourful pots amongst areas of dappled shade. This leads to the outstanding herbaceous borders, one of the best that you will find in Southern England. The path takes you to a charming summer house which looks back towards the  manor house. The atmosphere of the garden is superb with many different vistas and plenty of places to sit and take it all in. Combine your visit with a tour of this Arts and Crafts house.
SEZINCOTE HOUSE GARDENS
This garden at Sezincote surrounds a fine house built to encompass Indian character in 1810. It is reminiscent of the Brighton Dome.
At Sezincote House and Garden the Indian influence is seen in the drive that goes over an Indian Bridge with statues of bulls. Water features include a temple pool, Canal, stream bordered with bog loving plants.
More formal gardens to the side of the house with elephant statues. Past this and up the hill a new wild flower meadow has been established.
Fine trees include copper beeches, cedars, limes and yews with many unusual shrubs.
SNOWSHILL MANOR GARDENS
This charming small organic garden surrounds this Cotswold Tudor Manor House known as Snowshill Manor.
Snowshill Manor and Garden is set in the middle of the Cotswolds amongst some of the most beautiful countryside in the British Isles.
Very much in the Hidcote style ( though much smaller) but also a reminder of the Arts and Craft movement it has  garden rooms planted to the brim and full of interest and boldly planted pots.
The 2 acre gardens are organically grown with colourful borders, water features and splendid views.
STANWAY HOUSE AND FOUNTAIN, NEAR WINCHCOMBE
If you are visiting the Cotswolds and are interested in Garden history make sure you take time to visit Stanway House
Stanway Manor House and Fountain is surrounded by 20 acres of grounds which are now complemented by its newly partly restored baroque water garden.
This is one of the finest water features in Britain with pyramid cascade ( not restored), upper pond, waterfall, grand canal. The 300 foot high fountain from June is fantastic and will take your breath away. There are some exceptional trees including old cedars of Lebanon. At the top of the Garden are some breathtaking views.
SUDELEY CASTLE AND GARDENS
'The Queen of the Cotswolds', the garden at Sudeley Castle surrounds a fine Castle which was desecrated by Cromwell in the Civil War.
'The Queen of the Cotswolds', the garden at Sudeley Castle surrounds a fine Castle which was desecrated by Cromwell in the Civil War.
Designed as a continuation of the Castle, the inspiration for the gardens draws on and reflects Sudeley’s rich history. Eminent landscape designers including Lanning Roper, Rosemary Verey, Jane Fearnley-Whittingstall, Charles Chesshire and, more recently, Sir Roddy Llewellyn have all been involved in the design and layout of the gardens.
There are 14 acres, the highlight being the Queens Garden, built on an Elizabethan parterre and filled with old-fashioned roses.
WESTBURY COURT GARDEN, NEAR GLOUCESTER
This formal Dutch Westbury Court Water Garden was laid out between 1696 and 1705 and created by the owner of Westbury Court which is no longer standing.
The Westbury Court Water Gardensinclude a long canal of 137 metres. bordered by yew hedges.
An elegant Dutch style pavilion is at the head of one canal which you can enter giving great views over the garden.
Wander round the garden and take in the unique and unusual design.
There is a small secret walled garden and don't miss the evergreen holm oak which could be the oldest in the country.
WESTONBIRT ARBORETUM AND PLACES TO STAY NEAR TETBURY
Westonbirt Arboretum, the National Arboretum is managed by the Forestry Commission and is one of the finest arboretums in the world.
Westonbirt Arboretum has over 18,000 trees from all over the world, planted since 1829 and plantings continue today. The arboretum is in 2 areas with 17 miles of way-marked trails.
There is the formal arboretum which contains many fine specimens including most of the rhododendrons and magnolias. The acers look great in Spring with their mellow tints whilst the older and more mature trees are coloured with emerald green.
The other areas known as the Silk Wood  and is more informal but again with many great trees. Spring in the Silk Wood is a great time with masses of bluebells appearing late April and May. This is followed by the trees in full in June with masses of wild flowers on the slopes approaching the wood. On hot summer days there is a freshness in the woods, rather like being by the sea.
Westonbirt is well known for its magnificent Autumn tints from around mid October to mid November and is a must visit.
Exbury Gardens, New Forest
Exbury Garden is a wonderful place for early summer and autumn colours
Exbury Garden is a spectacular 200 acre woodland garden famous for the Rothschild collection of rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias. Back in 1987 the grounds were devastated by the great storm with a loss of 700, trees and rhododondrens. The garden is also known as the American Garden as many of the rhododendrons were replaced by American hybrids which originally came from Exbury.
The daffodil meadow overlooks the Beaulieu River and looks stunning in March and early April. Amongst the many other features are, rock gardens, rose gardens, herbaceous borders, rare shrubs and exotic trees ensure year round interest.
Superb autumn colour.
There are many walks and trails including by the side of the tidal estuary, a great place for bird watchers and nature lovers.
Enjoy also the newly opened steam railway and Summer Lane Garden, planted with huge swatches of herbaceous perennials and grasses. Features include a bridge, tunnel and viaduct.
Furzey Gardens, near Lydhurst
These delightful, informal gardens known as Furzey Garden was established in 1922 and is renowned for its all year round beauty. Set in the New Forest it is a great place to visit when on holiday.
Furzey Garden near Lydhurst, in the Spring and early summer is a really special place to visit. There are plenty of places throughout from which sit and to enjoy the lake and wildlife, heather garden and a host of Summer and Winter flowering shrubs and trees of botanical interest at all seasons.
See the extensive collections of azaleas and rhododendrons, the strange Bottle Brush tree and flaming Chilean Fire trees.
More to this garden than you can imagine and best visited in May although there is something to see in every season.
Hillier Gardens & Arboretum
The Sir Harold Hillier Gardens and Arboretum is lovely in every season.
As Spring arrives the Hillier Garden bursts with an explosion of colour. There is much to see along Spring Walk with Camellias, Rhododendrons and Magnolias.
But also consider visiting in the winter, in January the Winter Garden is stunning with, daphne, witch hazel, dogwood, grasses and other colouful plants.
The Hillier Gardens cover 180 acres, 12000 different species and 40000 plants. 11 National collections. Herbaceous and bog gardens. You will need the best part of a day here.
Hinton Ampner House and Garden, near Winchester
Hinton Ampner is a great garden set in the rolling Hampshire countryside.
The garden at Hinton Ampner House, near Winchester covers 12 acres has some excellent topiary as well as colourful borders in pastel shades. Scented plants, terraces and great views add to the atmosphere of the garden. The walled garden is now open. Take time to visit the elegant House which is also open which has a fine collection of furniture, paintings and art.

Houghton Lodge Gardens

Houghton Lodge and its gardens are situated close to the historic small town of Stockbridge.
There are 12 acres of Grade II* Gardens at Houghton Lodge in a lovely position next the the River Test famous for its trout fishing.
The gardens have both formal and informal areas with some very colourful borders and the 14 acres adjoining the garden provide an experience of the natural world with meadow walks through the peaceful and unspoiled surroundings of the River Test. See many rare varieties of orchids in the Orchid House.
Houghton Lodge is one of the finest (and earliest) surviving examples of a Cottage Ornι – a genre of ‘picturesque’ Gothic architecture that flourished for about 25 years from 1790. It has become one of the must see houses to visit Hampshire has to offer.
Longstock Water Gardens
As summer progresses at Longstock Water Gardens further plants come to life giving vibrant colour to the garden.
Longstock Park Water Garden, judged the finest water garden in the world by the International Water Lily Society, is open by kind permission of the John Lewis Partnership for the benefit of 12 charities every year. People flock from miles around to see the beautiful secluded lakes which attract an abundance of wildlife in all its forms.
In May, the many varieties of rhododendron and azalea will be spreading vibrant drifts of colour throughout the woodland area and the irises will be blooming around the lakes.

Mottisfont Abbey Gardens

Mottisfont Abbey Gardens are set in the delightful Test Valley, where the River Test the famous trout river follows its journey to the sea.
Mottisfont Abbey is famous for its Rose Gardens set within a walled garden.
Fabulous scents from old fashioned roses trail walls, pergolas, arches and abound everywhere. Other plants intermingle giving a fantastic picture of intense colours.
The roses are best in the last 2 weeks of June but much is dependent on the weather.
Plenty more to see within the walled garden with lovely lavender walk and colourful herbaceous gardens and a small lavender parterre close to the Abbey. This is a must visit garden in June.
The grounds are now open most of the year and there is a new winter garden ( around 0.5 acre ) which is starting to mature. There are also walks some of which are guide led.
The historic Abbey is also a must see with many superb rooms, furniture and decorations.
The Manor House Garden - Jekyll
In 1908 when she was 65 Gertrude Jekyll designed a garden owned by Charles Holme at Upton Grey.
Gertrude Jekyll drew plans for the four and a half acre garden. On this chalky, sloping site she designed one of her most beautiful gardens. It includes many features of a typical Jekyll garden, but on a rather smaller scale than most of her commissions.
The whole is faithfully restored to the many plans and plants that Jekyll prescribed.
The Vyne House and Gardens
The Vyne House and Garden - Originally built as a great Tudor "power house," The Vyne was later home to the Chute family for over 350 years.
The Vyne and Garden is a fascinating microcosm of changing fads and fashions over five centuries and is filled with the family collections of furniture, portraits, textiles and sculpture. The attractive gardens and grounds feature an ornamental lake, one of the earliest summerhouses in England and woodland walks. A newly developed wetland area with a new bird hide now attracts a wide diversity of wildlife.
The gardens here are not extensive but are well maintained and the landscape is beautiful. The Walled garden is now open and being developed.
Well worth seeing if combined with a visit to the beautiful house.
West Green House Garden, near Basingstoke
This garden at West Green House has been restored since the Australian Marylyn Abbott took it over in 1993.
The main feature of the garden at West Green House is its charming walled garden with many different borders containing different types of plants from vegetables to roses separated by gravel paths.
The walled garden leads on to a classic style water garden with pools and rills appearing from a stone folly. The recently built Paradise fountain inspired by Traditional Islamic gardens is just around the corner and feels quite modern.
The rest of the grounds include a small lake with a Doric Temple, and are planted for the Spring with snakehead fritillaries, daffodils, primroses and bluebells. New Chinese inspired Five Bridges Garden.
Bryans Ground Garden, Stapleton (Nr. Presteigne)
This superb garden has been developed since 1993 by David Wheeler and Simon Dorrell who are also well known for their publication 'Hortus'.
There are three acres of intimate garden rooms at Bryans Ground surrounding an 'Arts ands Crafts' house that have been growing since 1913.
Furnished with follies and fragrant flowers, towers and topiary, pools and a potager, and paths to five acres of specimen trees on the banks of a river, on the border with Wales.
Hampton Court Gardens
Medieval Magnificence in a Magical Setting. Extending for over 1000 acres across prime Herefordshire Countryside, Hampton Court Castle is framed by its vast estate that shares over 600 years of history and English heritage.
Simon Dorrell and David Wheeler have transformed the gardens over the last 10 years. “The gardens are one of the most ambitious horticultural creations of our time”. The gardens have been revived and transformed. Estate masons and carpenters have meticulously restored many original structures, and inspirational new features have been added. Today, water canals, island pavilions, avenues and borders complement the established planting of the earlier eras. The Gardens are a peaceful haven, but also a place of exploration with a maze, Gothic Tower and secret tunnel to a waterfall. The Ornamental Kitchen Garden is both beautiful and productive and visitors can sample its delicious organic produce in the Orangery Restaurant, or enjoy a picnic on the lawn. Voted one of the Top 50 best gardens in the UK by The Independent.
Hergest Croft Gardens
Hergest Croft is unusual in having been gardened continuously by three generations of the same family over the past one hundred and thirteen years.
At Hergest Croft Gardens four distinct gardens extend for over 28 ha with more that 5000 rare trees and shrubs extending from spring blossom to brilliant autumn colour. The Kitchen Garden grows unusual vegetables, also contains with Spring borders and double herbaceous borders, and old fashioned roses. Brilliantly coloured rhododendrons and azaleas up to 30 feet grow in the Azalea Garden and Park Wood. The Gardens has over 60 champion trees in one of the finest collections in the British Isles.
Ralph Court Gardens
Ralph Court Gardens have 12 amazing gardens set in the grounds of a gothic rectory. From Italy to Africa the gardens transport you around the world and beyond into a fantasy world. The gardens are brimming with plants, sculptures and water features.
Whether you love or hate gardening, are an adult or a child, you will be mesmerised and be surprised around every corner of the 3 acre garden.
The garden is wheel chair friendly and all areas are accessible.
Staunton Park Gardens
The gardens at Staunton Park date back to the 1850s when they formed part of the "pleasure grounds" of the then large estate.
The present 10-acre garden at Staunton Park contains many mature specimen trees, a knott garden, kitchen garden and a Victorian rock garden, as well as extensive mixed borders. A woodland path leads to a lake surrounded by rhododendrons and continues round the lake, past the 18th century dove-cot and back to the house offering views to the undulating landscape of the Welsh Marches - an ideal garden in which to spend a restful afternoon.
Stockton Bury Gardens
Stockton Bury Gardens are beautiful giving colour and interest all year round.
The four-acre Stockton Bury Garden have been created by Raymond Treasure and Gordon Fenn. They have an extensive collection of plants, many rare and unusual set amongst medieval buildings; a real kitchen garden, pigeon house, tithe barn, grotto, cider press, pools, ruined chapel and rill, all surrounded by unspoilt countryside
Westonbury Mill Gardens
Westonbury Mill Gardens in Herefordshre are laid out around a tangle of streams and pondsbehind the Old Corn Mill. Planting includes a huge variety of moisture loving and bog plants with splendid primulas, irises, rushes and grasses.
Numerous bridges connect the different areas of the garden and you can walk through a forest of giant gunnera. There are unusual features including a castellated stone tower with gargoyles which spout water raised by an old iron water wheel.
Adjacent to the main garden a wild flower garden is being developed with walks besides the stream and mill leat.
Westonbury Mill is in a wonderfully peaceful area of the Welsh Marshes close to the historic half timbered village of Pembridge and is a great place to visit in Herefordshire.
Benington Lordship Garden, near Stevenage
The historic site of Benington Lordship, and the views over surrounding parkland lend this garden a unique atmosphere.
The garden at Benington Lordship is famed for its displays of snowdrops around the moat, ruins and Pulham Folly which are complemented by helebores and winter flowering shrubs.
A winter stroll also incorporates the ponds with reflections of the shrubs with coloured barks.
Spring follows with swathes of scillas, daffodils, and fritilaries, before the summer glory of the roses and spectacular double herbaceous borders.
In the walled kitchen garden, vegetables are still grown, alongside the growing collection of named snowdrop varieties - 200 to date.
Rickmansworth
Chenies Manor House is an early-Tudor (15th/16thC) house, brick built with fortified tower with beautiful gardens.
Chenies Manor was the original home of the Russells (Earls, now Dukes of Bedford) and was often visited by Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.
There are a variety of gardens which include a Tudor-style sunken garden, a white garden, Victorian kitchen garden and 2 mazes. A display of over 4000 tulips and other bulbs is on show in Apr and May.
An abundance of colour throughout the summer with roses and cottage plants will ensure your visit to Chenies Manor is rewarded.
The historic house is also open and must be visited.
Docwra's Manor Garden, near Royston
This lovely garden at Docwras Manor has been developed by Faith and the late John Raven is set in 2.5 acres.
Docwras Manor has an all year garden with interest for every season. Snowdrops start the year here followed by cyclamen and hellebores.
There are many areas, separated by walls and hedges, with both formal and informal areas.
Hatfield House Gardens
Dating from the 17th century, the gardens at Hatfield House have evolved into a gardener’s paradise.
At Hatfield House Garden visitors can enjoy the peace of the West Garden with its scented garden, fountains, and fascinating Longitude dial. Also view the famous Knot garden adjoining the Elizabethan Old Palace.
Formal and wilderness gardens, delightful in spring with bluebells and daffodils, are open throughout the season.
Knebworth House and Gardens
The historic Knebworth House and Gardens cover 28 acres. See why it is so famous
There have been gardens at Knebworth House since at least the 17th Century, but the present layout dates largely from the Edwardian era.The architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, who married into the Lytton family, simplified the ornate beds and statuary of the Victorian garden with lawns and avenues of pollarded lime trees.
Popular features of the 28 acres now include a maze, the organically run walled kitchen garden, the Gertrude Jekyll Herb Garden and the Dinosaur Trail, where 72 life-sized dinosaurs can be found grazing amongst the rhododendrons and the redwoods.
Mottistone Manor Garden, National Trust on the Isle of Wight
Mottistone Manor Garden, a must visit if you are on the Isle of Wight
This magical National Trust garden at Mottistone Manor on the Isle of Wight is planted to allow for climate change with colourful borders, shrub-filled banks and grassy terraces. It is set in a sheltered valley with views to the sea and surrounds an Elizabethan manor house (tenanted).
Look for the The Shack, a unique cabin retreat which was probably one of the first garden offices.
Osborne House Gardens
Osborne House and Gardens once the retreat of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert
Osborne House and Garden is a great day out and place to visit. After her marriage to Prince Albert in 1840, Queen Victoria felt the need for a family residence in the country.To use her own words, ‘a place of one’s own – quiet and retired’. Osborne House and Gardens was acquired to fulfil this role.
In keeping with the house, the terrace gardens were designed in formal Italianate style by Cubitt and Prince Albert himself. The walled garden has been restored as part of the Contemporary Heritage Gardens scheme run by English Heritage. The grounds at Osborne House are a delight with the Victorian spirit of the garden recaptured for modern visitors.
You can now visit the private beach overlooking the Solent where Queeen Victoria used to bathe.
Bedgebury National Pinetum, near Cranbrook
Open all year, Bedgebury is the perfect place to walk, cycle, ride or play in a spectacular world of trees.
Bedgebury's National Pinetum is a world-class collection of dramatic conifers and Bedgebury Forest has miles of family cycling, mountain-biking, riding, walking, Go Ape and adventure play for a parking fee per car (see website).
The Visitor Centre has a cycle franchise, a restaurant, showers and toilets. As a location for healthy outdoor activity in a beautiful natural setting and with accessibility for all ages and abilities, Bedgebury is in a class of its own.
Beech Court Garden, near Ashford
The ten acre informal garden at Beech Court is noted for its tranquillity and natural beauty.
Beech Court Gardens The peak of colour is in the month of May with rhododendrons, azaleas and viburnums in full bloom. The garden is also planted with rare and interesting trees including Kalopanax, Eucryphia (the tallest in Kent), Redwoods and a fine collection of acers. The present owner has introduced climbing roses, such as the famous Bobby James, Kitsgate and Paul’s Himalayan Musk. Island beds, spacious lawns and an interesting collection of many different varieties of hydrangeas make this a garden for all seasons.
Charts Edge Garden, near Westerham
Charts Edge is located on the outskirts of Westerham, Kent (near to Chartwell) as seen on TV and in the Good Gardens Guide.
There are 10 acres of spectacular gardens at Charts Edge interspersed with many unusual and diverse features including magnificent displays of rhododendrons and azaleas, a Victorian folly and dell garden, water gardens and cascades.
We also have a rill garden with rainbow border, a sculpture trail, rock gardens and mixed/herbaceous borders along with an exotic garden. The majority of the plants are labelled and there are many rare and unusual plants. Other features include a tearoom and plant sales. The gardens are ideally suited for all ages, and provide partial access for disabled visitors. Dogs and group tours are also welcome.
Chartwell House and Garden, near Sevenoaks
Home of the late Winston Churchill, the garden at Chartwell is set on a hill with magnificent views over the Weald.
Chartwell House and Garden is the home of the late Winston Churchill, and is set on a hill with magnificent views. This garden has much to see including a golden rose walk created in 1958 by their children. This is within a walled garden with vegetables and sweet peas which has been recently restored.
The ornamental design reflects the taste of Lady Churchill as does the plantings including the walled rose garden, where clematis intermingle with the roses.
Daffodils, camellias and magnolias give a good spring display.
Doddington Place Garden, near Sittingbourne
With a tea room serving delicious homemade cakes, scones and lunches, and special events throughout the year, Doddington Place Gardens is well worth a visit.
The Gardens at Doddington Place were originally designed by Markham Nesfield, father of the famous designer William Nesfield, and consist of 10 acres of beautiful landscaped gardens - a perfect place to enjoy a relaxing day.
With a notable woodland garden which is spectacular in May and June, bursting with colour from azaleas and rhododendrons, an Edwardian rock garden and sunken garden, there is plenty to see and enjoy. The rock garden has been completely restored and retains its original Edwardian framework
Extensive lawns and avenues are framed by impressive clipped yew hedges and fine trees add interest. The yews were planted by Maude Jeffreys (nee Oldfield) before the First World War. They are now one of the most memorable features of the gardens. 'The yews have evolved into giant mounds like a range of cumulus clouds.
Down House Gardens, near Orpington
Down House and Gardens the former home of Charles Darwin is a great place for a day out
Orchids, sundews, peas, hollyhocks and even weeds all played a central role in Charles Darwin’s evolutionary studies. Many of the experiments he conducted on them for over 40 years in his ‘living’ laboratory - his pretty garden at Down House near Orpington, Kent - have now been recreated by head gardener Toby Beasley and his team. They form the highlight of twice-weekly expertly guided tours of the restored Victorian grounds taking place throughout the summer.
The tours graphically bring to life Darwin ’s prolific studies of nature in his gardens at Down House and in the surrounding countryside.
Emmetts Garden, near Sevenoaks
This 19th century Emmetts Garden has outstanding views over the surrounding Kent countryside.
Emmetts Garden was established in the late 19th century in the style of William Robinson.
There are many rare and exotic plants and in Spring there are great displays of daffodils, bluebells, camellias and rhododendrons.
Good Autumn colour.
Godinton House, near Ashford
The lovely Godinton House has twelve acres of tranquil gardens.
Surrounded by mature parkland sits a mellow red brick Jacobean house with twelve acres of tranquil gardens. The garden at Godinton House has terraced lawns, topiary and a large lily pond make a formal area softened by herbaceous borders, mature magnolias and willows with roses and clematis tumbling down the steps.
A newly designed rose garden is a voluptuous mix of shrub roses and herbaceous planting and the Italian garden with its statuary, Mediterranean planting and gentle fountain make a perfect place to sit on a warm day.
The large walled garden is home to a spectacular collection of delphiniums, fruit trees have been planted on the walls and there are beds of cutting flowers and vegetables laid out in front of a new Victorian style greenhouse.
Goodnestone Park Gardens, near Canterbury
Jane Austen was a frequent visitor to Goodnestone Park this lovely 14 acre garden which surrounds a 1700 house.
Work on the Goodnestone Garden did not begin in earnest until the mid-1960s and the restoration and expansion to their present standard has primarily been the work of Margaret FitzWalter.
In the process she has created what many visitors regard to be one of the outstanding country gardens in England.
The garden features fine specimen trees, small arboretum with an avenue of limes. See the 1920s rockery and pond, rose garden and walled garden with climbing roses, jasmine, clematis.
The gardens cover roughly fifteen acres.
Great Comp Garden, near Sevenoaks
Great Comp is a garden of 7 acres, comprising many beautiful and rare shrubs, perennials and other hardy and half hardy plants.
Great Comp Garden is a plantsman's haven, with the year starting off with Helleborus, followed by Magnolias, Rhododendrons and Azaleas; then through the remainder of the year with rare and exotic shrubs and perennial plants - such as the huge collection of Salvias.
There are substantial areas of both formal and informal plantings - teasingly linked with meandering grass paths and home built ruins - homing in on an Italian Garden
Groombridge Place Garden, near Tunbridge Wells
Set in 200 acres, Groombridge Place features a series of magnificent, traditional walled gardens - set against the backdrop of a 17th century moated manor.
Set in 200 acres, Groombridge Place Garden features a series of magnificent, traditional walled gardens - set against the backdrop of a 17th century moated manor.In the ancient woodland of the 'Enchanted Forest' there's mystery, innovation and excitement for all ages. Plus Bird of Prey flying displays and canal boat cruises.
Hever Castle and Gardens
Hever Castle, on the Kent border have lovingly tended gardens bringing colour and life all the year round surround.
The Gardens at Hever Castle were set out in the early 1900s by William Waldorf Astor and have matured with something to see for most of the year.
Stroll through formal gardens at Hever Castle including the majestic Italian, Garden which houses statuary and sculpture dating from Roman times - much larger than you could imagine.
This extends to around 4 acres. See also the Tudor Herb Garden.
Hole Park Gardens
Hole Park has been owned by the Barham family for the past four generations and is set in over 200 acres of superb classic parkland. The colourful gardens enjoy far reaching views over the hills, woods and fields of the picturesque Kentish Weald. They are a skilful mix of formal design and more naturalised planting, giving colour throughout the seasons.
Ightham Mote Garden, near Sevenoaks
Ightham Mote and garden nestles in a sunken valley and dates from 1320.
The cottage style gardens at Ightham Mote, near Sevenoaks are a feature with long borders of traditional flowers such as sweet williams, campanulas and pinks. Vegetables are interplanted with herbs.
There is a lovely walled orchard with apple trees dating back to the 13th century.
The garden has more informal areas with shrubs, rhododendrons and exotic trees.
Leeds Castle Gardens, near Maidstone
The Wood Garden
In spring, the Wood Garden alongside the River Len is a particularly lovely way to approach the castle. Its carpet of Daffodils, Narcissi and Anemones presents a vibrant burst of colour. Later in the year, the visitor is treated to the splendor of Azaleas and Rhododendrons.
The Culpeper Garden
Named after the family who owned Leeds Castle in the 17th century; the Culpeper Garden was originally the site of the castle’s kitchen garden.
During Lady Baillie's ownership it became a cut flower garden, but in 1980 garden designer Russell Page transformed it into a large cottage garden.
With its informal layout and low box hedges as a border this very English garden features Roses, Lupins, Poppies and Lads' Love, with exotic blooms mixed in to create a profusion of colour and scent.
The Lady Baillie Mediterranean Garden Terrace
Designed by the landscape architect, Christopher Carter, on the site of Lady Baillie's original aviary the garden is a favourite destination for visitors to the castle. With its south facing aspect and Mediterranean style, visitors can relax and enjoy superb views across the Great Water.
Marle Place Gardens, Tonbridge
In the village of Brenchley, in Kent, Marle Place is a peaceful, privately owned Wealden garden, ten acres of formal planting and many more acres of woodland and orchard. Situated close to Scotney and Sissinghurst Castles.
Many times winner of the Kent Wildlife Gardens Gold Award, including 2013, given by Kent Wildlife Trust.
It is a plantman and artist's garden, featuring a Victorian gazebo, Edwardian rockery and walled fragrant garden. A restored 19th century greenhouse with orchid collection, a mosaic terrace and ornamental ponds. The 17th century house with a massive chimney is of architectural interest, but not open.
Penshurst Place Gardens
The gardens at Penshurst Place offer an abundance of variety in form, foliage and bloom throughout the year. From spring flowering bulbs, through fragrant summer roses and exuberant herbaceous borders to mellow orchard fruits. The garden culminates in a vivid blaze of autumnal colour before the winter starkness reveals its original shape and structure.
There is an Italian Garden with oval fountain, a beautiful rose garden planted with lavender, 2 medieval fish ponds.
Many small gardens surrounded by Yew hedges and herbaceous borders brimming with summer colour.
Port Lympne Mansion and Gardens
The Gardens at Port Lympney have many features including a vineyard, ornamental ponds, fountains and views to the sea.
There is a magnolia walk with planted terraces containing many statues, urns and ornaments.
The Port Lympne house is also open and features Spencer Roberts mural room, octagonal library and Morrocan patio.
Quex Gardens
The gardens at Quex were originally laid out in the fifteenth century when the first manor house was built, but were extensively remodelled throughout the nineteenth century, so that the present design contains strong Regency, Victorian and Edwardian influences. The gardens were designed to be viewed from the main withdrawing room on the first floor of the house, from where lawns radiate around a central vista ending in the far distance with the Gun Tower, one of three celebrated follies in the grounds.
The established parkland contains numerous ornamental specimen trees and a sunken fountain garden. This feature was once a formal Italianate garden and is currently undergoing extensive re-planting to restore formal borders and paths, which have been lost over time. A project which was funded by the Ass. of Independent Museums has recently been completed to have the pond and listed statues, which stand in the centre, fully restored.
On the upper terraces of the lawn, there are some fine specimen trees, including two venerable King James Mulberries and an ancient Sophora Japonica. Surrounding the upper terraces is an extensive shrub border and a vibrant Edwardian herbaceous border against a south wall. A more recent introduction is a rose border, established with the help of David Austin Roses, which contains a collection of the old roses and some new introductions.
Website: Quex Garden
Salutation Garden
Since the current owners took over The Secret Gardens have gone through an extraordinary metamorphosis. The garden was in a state of neglect; where the charming White Garden stands was once a pile of rubble and the Holm Oak Walk was totally overgrown.. Whilst the spirit and style of the original garden has been largely captured, several more modern features have been added such as the Tropical Border. The plants which grow in this sheltered section would simply not have been able to cope with the colder climate back in 1911. Within this area you will find the Wollemi Pine, an incredibly rare plant dating back to the Jurassic period, which is now part of a global conservation project to boost its numbers. Its rarity notwithstanding the plant has established itself well at The Secret Gardens.
Lake Patricia was added to the Gardens during the seventies. The island can be reached by a small bridge and is a remarkably tranquil place to sit and meditate on the beautiful surroundings. Future plans for this area include the planting of several species of flowering trees and the planting of roses to grow up the large circular arbour to create a flowering canopy.
Scotney Castle Gardens, near Tunbridge Wells
The Gardens at Scotney Castle surround the ruins of a 14th century moated castle.
The gardens at Scotney Castle have spectacular displays of Rhododendrons, azaleas and Kalmia. Wisteria and rambling roses cover the ruins in Summer and trees and ferns provide rich autumn colours.
Good walks in the grounds with wonderful viewpoints and vistas. The estate covers over 700 acres.
The new house is also open to the public where you can also learn the history of the property and see its rooms set out in a victorian style.
Sissinghurst Castle Gardens
Sissinghurst Castle is one of the most famous and delightful gardens in the British Isles.
Sissinghurst Castle garden was created by Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson who transformed the ruins of this Elizabethan mansion and gardens in the 1930s.
The garden is divided into a series of rooms filled with informal arrangements of plants around a theme: the White Garden, the Purple Border, the Rose Garden, the Herb Garden, the Lime Walk, and the Cottage Garden.
The White Garden with Rosa mullingani has cascades of white flowers and is surrounded by other white and grey plants.
Walmer Castle and Garden, near Deal
Walmer Castle the Royal residence of the Lords Warden of the Cinque Ports is set on the Kent Coast overlooking the sea.
Walmer Castle was the garden created for the late HM Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.
Penelope Hobhouse redesigned part of the garden to celebrate the late Queen Mothers 95th birthday. This features a herbaceous border alongside a canal.
There is a 100 metre long broad-walk in the ornamental area flanked by beautiful herbaceous borders.
Kitchen Garden with fruit trees, greenhouse and cut flowers garden.
Drifts of daffodils in the Spring and wildflower Meadow. The Greenhouses have been restored.
Moat garden, woodland walk.
Play croquet on the oval lawn.
The castle built during the reign of Henry V111 can also be visited so that you can see the interior and learn more of its history.
Website: Walmer Castle
BRANTWOOD HOUSE AND GARDENS, CONISTON
Brantwood has a series of unusual and experimental gardens laid out by John Ruskin from 1871 – 1886.
Working with the natural materials of the site, John Ruskin developed various themes within the ancient woodlands and up on the high moorland behind his home. Later exotic plantings were added C1900, remnants of which have survived nearly a century of neglect.
The renaissance of this unique garden at Brantwood House involves the restoration of its historic structure and ideas.
Recent projects include the restoration of a spectacular and colourful Victorian ‘viewing terrace’ and the adventurous renovation of Ruskin’s ‘Zig-Zaggy’ – which takes the visitor on an unexpected journey through Purgatory to Dante’s ‘Earthly Paradise’.  
One of the loveliest sites in the Lake District, this dynamic garden provides plenty of fresh and thought-provoking ideas for everyone.
BROCKHOLE GARDEN AND VISITOR CENTRE
Brockhole has 30 acres of gardens and grounds, designed by Thomas Mawson 1898.
Brockhole Garden and Vistor Centre.
Formal Edwardian. Terraced garden with clipped box and yew hedges.
• Spring bulbs, rhododendrons and azaleas, magnolias and camellias
• Herbaceous and mixed borders
• Old fashioned and shrub roses
• Wildflower meadow
• Kitchen garden with fruit, vegetables, herbs and cut flowers. The acid soils and unusually mild microclimate mean that Brockhole gardens are the place to see unusual plants such as Eucryphias, Desontaniea (Chilean Holly), Cupressus cashmeriana (Kashmir cypress, Crinodendron hookerianum (Chilean lantern tree) and many more.
DALEMAIN HOUSE AND GARDENS
Dalemain is a delightful Lake District Garden.
Just two miles from Ullswater, the sheltered Dalemain House Gardens, near Ullswater are a haven of tranquillity.  Wander along the Georgian terrace border.  Stroll in the Tudor knot garden. The Rose Walk with over 100 old-fashioned roses and ancient apple trees of named varieties,
leads to the Gazebo, set into the eighteenth-century garden wall.
In mid-summer the Gazebo is all but hidden behind a profusion of Clematis tangutica. Meander among the meconopsisin Dalemain's Low Garden  or take a walk through shady Lob's Wood.  
The historic house which dates from the 14th century is also open.
Whether you are a keen gardener or an enthusiastic amateur, you are sure to find many delights in Dalemain House Garden.
HOLKER HALL GARDENS
The immaculately kept Gardens at Holker Hall (25 acres in all) are part woodland, part formal and essentially Victorian in character.
Holker Hall & Gardens - The 200 acre 'natural' parkland is the result of the late 18th century planting of Lord George Cavendish. In the early 19th century several new features were added: an arboretum, a conservatory, balustraded terraces by the House, and a large walled kitchen garden.
Lord and Lady Cavendish have sought not only to conserve the historic but have made changes and additions to the Gardens that are still being made today the old croquet lawn planted as a 'garden room' is one of the formal highlights of a visit to Holker Hall.
HUTTON-IN-THE-FORREST
Hutton-in-the-Forest is a beautiful historic house with lovely gardens on the north eastern edge of the Lake District.
Hutton in the Forest House and Garden is surrounded by woodland of the medieval forest of Inglewood
There is a beautiful walled garden, built in the 1730s and this is the wonderful setting for a large collection of herbaceous plants.
The topiary terraces around the House which were laid out in the 17th century are the foundation for a Victorian woodland garden. The fine specimen trees and the 17th century dovecote form part of the Woodland walk.
The historic house with its fine rooms  is also open and should not be missed It has been occupied by the same family since the 1650's.
LEVENS HALL GARDEN, NEAR KENDAL
The Topiary Gardens at Levens Hall are world-famous in their own right, and are a must for any visitor to the English Lake District.
Levens Hall Garden is an amazing place to visit in in Cumbria The gardener Monsieur Guillaume Beaumont, who had been trained under Le Nτtre at Versailles and who had laid out the gardens at Hampton Court started work in 1694 creating the design for the garden you can see today.
Under the magnificent topiary, depending on the time of your visit, you will find colourful Spring or Summer bedding. There is also a rose garden, a nuttery, fine herbaceous borders, and a fountain garden laid out with pleached limes to celebrate 300 years of the Gardens at Levens Hall.
LOWTHER CASTLE AND GARDENS
130 acres of lost gardens dating back 350 years set against the dramatic backdrop of a ruined early 19th century sandstone Lowther Castle, both in the process of restoration.
At the wonderful Lowther Castle and Garden there are broad lawns and wide paths, original garden buildings and features, and wilder areas, with beautiful mountain views from the west escarpment; wildlife including red squirrels and crested newts thrive. 
The garden is subject to a major renovation and this is your chance to see it as it progresses. You will not find perfect lawns or borders but the place has a magnificent atmosphere that many love.
SIZERGH CASTLE AND GARDEN
Sizergh Castle is surrounded by lovely grounds and park with specimen trees and woodland walks.
At Sizergh Castle  there are many different features with formal terraces in the garden, herbaceous borders, wall plants and roses 
There is a delightful wild flower meadow, a Dutch Garden and large limestone rock garden.
Moisture loving plants hug the sides of rocky streams and pools including the National Collection of four genera of hardy ferns.
The image shows one of the pools at Sizergh.
Take time to visit the historic castle with its fine wood panelling.
Events throughout the year plus activities for children. Sizergh Castle is a great day out for all the family.

 

COBBLE HEY GARDEN
The many flower beds at Cobble Hey surround the lawns, bursting with different shades and tones, are full of perennials such as phlox and delphiniums.
Cobble Hey gardens are hidden away in the rural  area of Claughton, Garstang . The cottage garden is the most dominant area.  In the woodland area you will find three ponds all connected by a naturally running stream over 90 metres long.    At the other end of the garden is the formal garden.  This is a small, quaint little parterre area with box and yew hedging and spiral box. This is just one of the interesting areas of the garden. In all, Cobble Hey is a garden with breathtaking views, which you must visit, because it is creative , unusual and definitely inspiring.
GRESGARTH HALL GARDENS, NEAR LANCASTER
This delightful garden at Gresgarth Hall has been created by the renowned garden designer Arabella Lennox-Boyd.
The garden at Gresgarth Hall includes terraces, lake, small bog garden, a wild garden, extensive kitchen garden, a bluebell wood, the millennium wood, the rhododendron hillside, the herbaceous borders, and a serpentine walk.
There are many different plants, shrubs and trees to see including many moisture loving plants, ferns, acers, lilacs as well azaleas and magnolias.
Modern and classical sculpture is displayed throughout the Gresgarth Hall garden.
RUFFORD OLD HALL - NATIONAL TRUST, LANCASHIRE
This 16th century house Rufford Hall is surrounded by gardens created in a Victorian style.
At Rufford Old Hall and Gardens  - National Trust, in Lancashire there are woodland areas with displays of rhododendrons and azaleas and some interesting topiary including 2 squirrels.
Colourful herbaceous borders, climbing plants and collection of old fashioned plants.
Orchard with old varieties of apple.
The amazing looking House is also open with fine collection of 16th and 17th century of oak furniture. It also has collections of armoury and tapestry. The great Hall's hammer-beam roof with Angels must be seen.
All in all you will have a great day out here.
BARNSDALE GARDENS, NEAR OAKHAM
The gardens at Barnsdale were made famous by the late Geoff Hamilton of BBC Gardeners World.
In 1984 Geoff Hamilton of BBC Gardeners World found a Victorian farmhouse with over 5 acres of land, 'Barnsdale Garden' was born! All but half an acre was pasture - he was like a child with a new toy! A local farmer was asked to plough most of it, and after planting one or two mature trees and shrubs he couldn't bear to leave behind he set about on the first project. Two years later Gardeners' World was well established in its new home with Geoff's natural and down to earth style making him a hit with the viewers. He married his second wife Lynda and the rest, I'm sure, all of you have followed over the years.
Now see the gardens within the Garden that he created.
LONG CLOSE GARDEN
Lovely garden at Long Close developed over many years, a real plantsman's garden.
These organic gardens at Long Close are set in 5 acres  with terraces, pools, herbaceous borders, and a great collection of rhododendrons.are of an idyllic nature.
They are reminiscent of those books of childhood days about magic, secret places and never-ending summers. Oh so very English, the sound of cricket, laughing children, cream teas and baskets of freshly harvested vegetables. 
This sums up my experience, both now and in my formative years, of Long Close, a timeless place, that instilled in me, at a very young age, a great love of trees and all things green and creepy crawly.
BELTON HOUSE AND GARDEN, NEAR GRANTHAM
The Gardens at Belton House built in the late 1600s have been restored over recent years.
See the sunken Italian Garden at Belton House and Garden designed by Jeffry Wyattville at the beginning of the 19th century.
The Dutch Garden dating from the 1870s includes Yew and more formal beds edged by lavender. There is an orangery and re-creation of the statue walk.
There are extensive grounds of 1000 acres with woodland walks, two lakes, and avenues which give an impressive feel to the Estate.
BRIGHTWATER GARDENS, SAXBY
This 21st century garden will interest every visitor within its 8 acres - yew hedging and walls enclose magical garden rooms full of roses and herbaceous plants.
Brightwater Gardens, Saxby is set in approximately 8 acres and continues to be developed.
It is a great place to visit for Garden Lovers with colourful plantings and lovely views.
A long terrace, pergola, dry and damp gardens lead onto a hillside planted with rarer trees overlooking a winter garden and reflective pond.
Paths lead through a woodland, prairie and wildflower meadows planted with over 150,000 naturalising bulbs.
There are big drifts of Achillea and Salvia contrast with Coreopsis, Verbascum , Peroskia, Sedum Rudbeckia and Helenium to give a striking mid summer display.
DODDINGTON HALL AND GARDEN, NEAR LINCOLN
Doddington Hall has five acres of romantic walled and wild gardens including a Kitchen Garden growing vegetables for the popular Farm Shop and Restaurant.
Dodington Hall and Gardens are great throughout the seasons. 
In early spring, scented flowering shrubs and naturalised native spring bulbs create wonderful displays with drifts of Crocus and Snowdrops, along with Carmine Cyclamen. Rhododendrons, Dogs-tooth violets, Crown Imperials, Scillas, Fritilleries and Lent Lilies soon follow.
In April, there are dozens of fascinating rare Daffodil cultivars throughout the garden.  In late May and June, the Parterres of the walled West Garden are filled with Bearded Iris and the Bryan Dodsworth collection of tall Bearded Irises was moved to Doddington during 2012. 
The Kitchen Garden is a highlight in later summer and also features a cutting garden. Crisp topiary, magnificent old trees, a turf maze and a Temple of the Winds ensure there is year round interest.
GOLTHO GARDENS, NEAR MARKET RASEN
The garden boasts a long grass walk flanked by abundantly planted mixed borders, from which a network of paths and walkways meander.
Goltho Garden is laid out with a strong feeling of colour, form and texture in both flowers and foliage this reflecting our interest in a wide range of plants, including some rare and unusual ones.
The nursery contains a wide range of mainly herbaceous perennials many of which are quite unusual.  Most of the plants are grown not only for their flowers, but also for their interesting form and foliage.
GRIMSTHORPE CASTLE GARDENS
The historic Grimsthorpe Castle has beautiful gardens and lovely views
Grimsthorpe with its lovely gardens has been the home of the de Eresby family since 1516, when it was granted by Henry VIII to the 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby on the occasion of his marriage to Maria de Salinas, kinswoman and lady-in-waiting to Queen Catherine of Aragon. 
The formal flower and topiary garden leads imperceptibly into the woodland garden, and provides a fine setting for the ornamental vegetable garden and orchard, created in the 1960’s by the Countess of Ancaster and Peter Coates.
Intricate parterres marked with box hedges lie close to the Castle, and a dramatic herbaceous border frames views across the lake.
GUNBY HALL GARDENS, LINCOLNSHIRE
These gardens at Gunby Hall date from the 17th century, with planting in the 19th century by Peregrine Massingberd.
The walled gardens at Gunby Hall in Lincolnshire are the focal point with arched pergolas of fruit trees, herbaceous and cutting borders, roses and herb garden. There is also a kitchen garden with old fashioned vegetables, fruit and flowers. The lawns of the house lead to a wild garden and shrubbery. See also the large cedar of Lebanon, ghost walk pond and wild flower walk. Large collection of Spring bulbs.
HALL FARM GARDENS AND NURSERY
This delightful 1 acre garden at Hall Farm is open most of the year and adjoins the nursery which sells a wide range of specialist plants.
There are beautiful gardens at Hall Farm Nursery with colourful herbaceous borders and many unusual plants, together with over 100 different roses, some on pergolas.
Lovely formal and informal areas. Colour everywhere.
Terraces, pond and plenty to see.
Well worth a visit and take a cheque book for those plants to take home.
 
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