Wooden Window Boxes


Isis-Windowbox
 

Window Box Fitting


To fit your window box attach the supplied batten to the wall with the supplied screws and rawplugs and then slot the window box onto the batten.  See image opposite.

Isis Wooden Window Box


The Isis is a classic panel style windowbox that will enhance any window ledge, wall or fence.
Isis windowboxes are made from Scandinavian red pine, fitted with our easy to use, concealed hanger (together with all the fixings), plus holes in the base for good drainage.  If you would prefer a plain back to stand on the windowsill rather than hanging from the wall or fence, make a note in the 'special instructions' box on the way to the checkout. 
It can be finished in clear, golden brown or wild sage preservative. We also offer a selection of Farrow & Ball paint finishes.
 
Window Box Dimensions: 100x32.5x25cm(h)
Iisis-Windowbox
 

Window Box Fitting

 
 
how-to-plant-your-window-box
 
Garden-Tips
Preservatives
Sage-Window boxSage
White-Window boxWhite
Golden Brown-Window boxGolden Brown
Farrow and Ball Colours
Pitch-Black (Farrow & Ball)Black
Pitch-Blue (Farrow & Ball)Blue
Chappell_Green_No83Green
Pigeon (Farrow & Ball)Pigeon
all-white (Farrow & Ball)White
Product Name
Timber
Finish
Price
Quantity & Finish
(Select in Basket)
 
Isis Window Box
100x32.5x25cm(High) (IWB)
 
Pine
 
Clear,Golden Brown,White or Sage
  
£130,00
 
 
 
Isis Window Box
100x32.5x25cm(High) (IWB.COL)
 
Pine
 
Farrow & Ball paint.
 
 
£166,00
 
 
 
 
 
Delivery approximately 30 days Postage and Packaging is included for the Uk Mainland.
We also offer a bespoke service, so if you would like this or any of our own wooden products made to your own preferred measurements please contact us and we will be pleased to help.
If you live in the Channel Islands, Highlands and Islands or Ireland please ring 01952 541170 or email sales@thelichfieldplantercompany.co.uk  for a quote for delivery.
 
 

Keeping  your window box plants after the season is over


Many  favourite  window box plants- annual  lobelia. African  and French  marigolds  (Tagetes)  and zinnia,  for example  - will only  live for one year-and should be discarded  once  they are past their best. The same applies  to hardy annuals,  such as candytuft.  godetia, larkspur and pot marigold (Calendula), often used  in pots  for- instant effect.
Biennials, such as Canterbury  bells and forget-me-nots,  are sown in one year to flower the next, and can be bought ready to plant at the end of their first year. Daisies,  stocks, sweet williams and wallflowers  -  all really short-lived perennials  -  are also best  treated  as biennials: enjoy their flowers for a year and then dig them out.
Bulbs are the mainstay of most spring window boxes,  and a window box of lilies is one of the glories  of summer. But once  the flowers  have finished you are left with unappealing  window boxes of foliage. Hardy  spring  bulbs can last for two or three seasons in the same compost before it needs  replacing.  And all kinds of lilies will flower successfully in the same window boxes for several
 
 
 
 
Planters-and-Garden-Pergola
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plants for Window
Boxes
To help you select the best plants for your Window Box. We have put together a list with pictures and tips for cultivation indexed under the seasons of the year.
     
 
 
 
years if the bulbs are planted  in a good humus-rich,  soil-based  compost. The lilies shouldn't need insulating in cold weather as long  as you plant  them in good heavy frost-proof window boxes.
Move the window boxes into an out-of-the-way place and allow the foliage to die down naturally. Cutting  leaves  off or tying them in knots will stop them from making  nutrients for next year's  bulbs and will lead to a disappointing display the following spring. lf you have nowhere  to relocate  the window
 
 
Spire-Wooden-Garden-Obelisk
 

Keeping  your window box plants after the season is over


boxes, but feel  the dying foliage looks untidy you can surround  the bulbs with bedding  or  foliage plants  as a disguise.
Keep  the compost almost dry in winter and move  the bulbs  back  into the limelight  when  the new shoots  emerge.
Alternatively, you can carefully lift bulbs and their foliage  and plant them out in the garden border. Large-flowered hybrid tulips are not worth growing  on, even  in the garden, for a second  season. They may never flower again, and even if they do the flowers will  probably  be poor. Discard  the
bulbs  and start again. However, you can plant botanical 'species'  forms of tulip and large-flowered  hyacinths  in the open ground after their first spring.
Half-hardy  bulbous  plants, such as dahlias  and gladioli  should be allowed to die down naturally. Then dig out the tubers, clean  and dry them thoroughly, and store  in vegetable nets or old tights
hung in a cool, frost-free,  dark  place until replanting time. Label the tubers by colour  to help  you when replanting.
 
 
 
 
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