Fruit from your garden

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Rasberry canes grown from suckers
 
Propagating from suckers.

          These healthy suckers have grown into a promising row of 'Glen Cova' raspberry canes.
 
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Ornamental Shrubs
Page 16
Methods of propagating fruiting plants.

Methods of propagating fruiting plants.


Do not use old branches: To be suitable for layering, a branch must be healthy and not the product of a rootstock that has been used for grafting. It also needs to be not more than two years old, otherwise its bark is likely to be too thick for the roots to pierce.
New hazelnut and raspberry bushes for free: In winter cut the hazelnut or raspberry plant you want to propagate down to soil level. Then build a ridge of soil up over the remaining stump. When spring arrives you will find several shoots beginning to take root in the ridge. The following winter simply level out the ridge and cut all the runners and their roots from the mother plant and plant in position.
 
Suckers will create suckers: A sucker is merely a new tree or bush developing from the roots of an older one. Don't be confused by the idea that suckers suck the goodness out of the plants. In fruit gardening, suckers are desirable - they ensure your plant keeps fruiting.
  • Dig up the sucker complete with some roots and replant it where you want it to grow. It will reproduce the characteristics of the tree or shrub that created it, unless the mother plant was grafted. Propagation with suckers is usual for morello cherry, hazelnut, strawberry and raspberry.
  • Plants produced from suckers will tend to produce suckers themselves, which can make them invasive. Grow such plants in a planter or a corner of the garden on their own.
 

Methods of propagating fruiting plants.


Sowing.
Cuttings.
Suckers.
Apricot (some)
Currant
Cherry (Morello)
Walnut
Fig
Hazelnut
Passion fruit
Vines
Strawberry
Peach (some)
Kiwi
Raspberry
Plum (some)
Passion fruit


Division.
Layering.
Shield grafts.
Currant
Blackberry
Apricot
Raspberry
Blackcurrant
Almond

Fig
Apple

Gooseberry
Cherry

Hazelnut
Citrus fruits

Vines
Medlar

Loganberry
Peach

Passion fruit
Pear

Kiwi
Plum
Digging up plant suckers
Divide to multiply: Division means separating a mother plant into pieces, each piece complete with roots, so that you can replant separate, smaller plants. Division should take place in the dormant period between October and March, but not in frosty weather. This technique is particularly suited to currant and raspberry bushes.
  • Take a flat spade and drive it down between the young shoots emerging from the earth and the rest of the mother plant. Dig out one part of the divided clump with your spade and replant it, preserving as many roots as possible.
  • Alternatively, lift the entire root from the ground and split it.
Willow water: For centuries, old-fashioned herbalists have known of the amazing properties of the willow. The easiest of all woody plants to root, it produces powerful hormones that also help other plants to grow and develop.
  • To make a willow water solution, in spring collect tender tips and leaves from a willow, cut them into 2-3cm pieces, and immerse a few handfuls in a litre of water for a week. Strain the mixture into jars and store in a cool place.
  • When propagating plants, dip fresh cuttings or roots in the solution for a few minutes before planting. Then water with the willow solution to give new plants an extra boost.
 

 
 
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