Garden Planters


Trough Planters- The Oli Wooden Garden Planter
 
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Trough Planters-

Oli Wooden Garden Planters


One of our trough planters, The Oli is a narrow wooden planter with feet used as divider, boundary, by a wall or, perhaps, in a tight space.
This planter is made from lengths of 4.5cm x 4.5cm Scandinavian red pine which are joined and glued with a high quality waterproof adhesive. The base is slatted with 20mm thick planks to allow for drainage. These trough planters are then treated with a high quality, plant friendly and water repellent preservative. The internal walls of these planters are now painted with a waterproof  paint sealant.
 
 
Planter Dimensions: 100x20x40(h)cm
 
Trough Planters- The Oli Wooden Garden Planter
 
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Product Name
Timber
Finish
Price
Quantity & Finish
(Select in Basket)
 
The Oli Wooden Garden Planter
100x20x40 (OLI)
 
Pine
Clear or Golden Brown
Preservative
  
£95,00
 
 
 
 
 
Delivery approximately 30 days Postage and Packaging is included for the Uk Mainland.
We also offer a bespoke service, so if you would like this or any of our own wooden products made to your own preferred measurements please contact us and we will be pleased to help.
If you live in the Channel Islands, Highlands and Islands or Ireland please ring 01952 541170 or email sales@thelichfieldplantercompany.co.uk for a quote for delivery.
 
 
 

Fruit Trees for your planters


Fruit trees make a great specimen plants for the for the  patio.  They  look  equally good on their own, or under planted with other fruits,  such as strawberries,  or with small flowering bedding  plants.
Most types of fruit tree are suitable  for  planter cultivation,  given the proper care and attention.  Apples, apricots,  cherries,  figs, nectarines,  peaches,  pears and plums  may all be grown as bushes  or standards, or trained as fans and espaliers against  a sunny wall.
When  buying fruit trees choose  varieties  that have been grown on a dwarfing rootstock  and are suitable for growing  in a restricted area.  And keep an eye open for cultivars that have been specially  raised for patio culture; new varieties  are being  introduced all the time with today's  smaller gardens in mind.
When planting a fruit tree, you may,  need to group more than one variety to ensure cross-pollination and guarantee a good crop.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plants for your  Planters
To help you select the best plants for your planters. Here is a list of two hundred plants, with pictures,  for planters listed by colour & season.
 
 

Fruit Trees for your planters


Alternatively,  choose  a self-fertile  variety: these  always have  the term  'self-fertile' within  their name, such as the plum, 'self-fertile Victoria'  or the pear 'self-fertile Conference'.
Instead,  you could  plant a 'family  tree', where two or more varieties  of a fruit tree, capable of pollinating  one another, have been grafted on to the same rootstock. Family  trees provide an excellent way of producing more than one kind of a particular  fruit without cultivating  several plants. A family  apple, for example, could  give you an early eater,  a late eater and a cooker all on one tree.
 
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Fruit Trees for your planters


 Caring for trees
When you are planting a fruit tree, use a large, stout planter  -  at least 60cm x 60cm. Your young tree may look lost in such a large planter  when you first plant it, but it will grow quickly and it will need  lots of space  to develop.
Wooden garden planters,  are preferable  to ceramic  planters which may crack  as the plant's  roots
expand. Plastic is not ideal for long-term  planting either, as it does not offer  enough insulation  against extreme temperatures. Plant up your planter  in its intended final position:  once it is filled with compost and the tree, it will probably  be too heavy  to move with ease.
Place plenty  of crocks in the base of the planter and plant your tree in John Innes No.3
compost which contain enough  fertiliser to get the sapling  established  in its first season.  Be careful not to bury the rootstock  in the compost or the tree could lose its dwarf character.
 
 
 
 
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