Garden Planters


 
 
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Garden Planters


We have many different styles of garden planters, all hand-crafted in wood.  Wood is a beautiful, natural material, and it is very difficult to beat the natural beauty of wooden garden planters, whether it's in the garden, on a small balcony or on an expansive patio.  Well-chosen planters in British oak, Scandinavian pine or durable British grown cedar will enhance any garden no matter how contemporary or sophisticated.
Wood as a construction material is not just a beautiful, natural material and is the only material that is a renewable resource that is used in the construction of garden planters.
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Planter Gardening


Planter gardening is satisfying to gardeners, because the plants are raised off the ground so can seen close up, so they have the incentive to nurture and cultivate them to a high standard.
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Garden Planters


 Wooden garden planters are usually light to mid-weight, so not so heavy, depending on the wood and size of the planters. Because of this, the portable and contained nature of the plantings in garden planters allows us to grow plants in our gardens that might otherwise be impossible to cultivate because of unsuitable soil or climatic conditions. Planter gardening can also satisfy  the artist within us allowing our imaginations the freedom to combine plants of all colours, shapes, sizes and textures, and to match the plants to the planters, and then place the planters where they benefit the garden the most.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Plants for your  Planters

To help you select the best plants for your planters. Here is a list of two hundred plants, with pictures,  for planters listed by colour & season. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Garden Planters

          Plants have been grown in decorative and utilitarian types of garden planters for thousands of years. From early mosaics and manuscripts, we know that the ancient Egyptians, Romans and Greeks grew aromatic plants, such as myrtle, box and bay in garden planters. They were aware that it was a practical and efficient growing technique, especially in areas where the soil was poor or shallow.
           In southern Spain, during the early part of the second millennium, the Moors created wonderfully decorative, enclosed and intimate gardens using many planters. Two famous gardens laid out in the middle of the fourteenth century, at the Alhambra and the Generalife in Granada, survive to  this day. They have now been restored and, although they are not completely accurate reproductions of the originals, they still retain the essence of their early design and planting.
           In Britain, early illustrated manuscripts of the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries show garden planters filled with plants growing in palaces and monastic gardens. It was not until the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries however, that there was a great blossoming of creative gardening. Inspired by the Italians, these designs frequently featured garden planters overflowing with all kinds of plants. In Northern Europe, citrus fruit trees were grown in garden planters (inside, safe from the outdoor elements), emulating the plantings of the Mediterranean countries. The fruit trees, in their garden planters, were then wheeled outdoors in the warmer weather to decorate formal paved areas.
          The same inspiration fired the Victorians with enthusiasm. Production of all types of garden planters, small as well as large, proliferated during the nineteenth century. They manufactured copies of classical urns in cast iron as well as the traditional materials of wood, stone, lead, and terracotta. They made elaborate, garlanded and swagged garden planters for standing on terraces beside well manicured lawns, and in summer planted them with tender exotics that had been nurtured in their greenhouses. The Edwardians also cherished a great love of gardens. Conservatories were all the rage and they moved garden planters full of begonias, bellflowers, fuschsias and schizanthus  from their conservatories into the garden and their homes to provide extra colour and interest. Today, garden planters are widely used and are in almost every garden.
          Today, even though Gardens are naturally beautiful, they sometimes need that little bit extra. An arrangement of garden planters will added another dimension to your home and garden. A little extra colour and more style in areas where there is no soil, allowing you to enjoy your favourite plants anywhere you choose.  Even people without gardens can have garden planters, window boxes or a hanging basket. Planters are invaluable in gardens where growing space is at a premium but they are also useful for decorating paved terraces, roof gardens or balconies.
 
 
 
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